Posts filed under ‘Influenza’

REVIEW ARTICLE – PCT to Distinguish Viral From Bacterial Pneumonia – Systematic Review and Meta-analysis 

Clin Infect Dis, 1 February 2020, V.70 N.3, P.538–542

Because of the diverse etiologies of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the limitations of current diagnostic modalities, serum procalcitonin levels have been proposed as a novel tool to guide antibiotic therapy. Outcome data from procalcitonin-guided therapy trials have shown similar mortality, but the essential question is whether the sensitivity and specificity of procalcitonin levels enable the practitioner to distinguish bacterial pneumonia, which requires antibiotic therapy, from viral pneumonia, which does not. In this meta-analysis of 12 studies in 2408 patients with CAP that included etiologic diagnoses and sufficient data to enable analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of serum procalcitonin were 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], .37–.71; I2 = 95.5%) and 0.76 (95% CI, .62–.86; I2 = 94.1%), respectively. Thus, a procalcitonin level is unlikely to provide reliable evidence either to mandate administration of antibiotics or to enable withholding such treatment in patients with CAP.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/70/3/538/5523199

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

March 24, 2020 at 8:47 pm

Detection of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses in Air Sampled From a University Campus: A Longitudinal Study

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 2020 V.70 N.5 P.850–858

Background

Respiratory virus–laden particles are commonly detected in the exhaled breath of symptomatic patients or in air sampled from healthcare settings. However, the temporal relationship of detecting virus-laden particles at nonhealthcare locations vs surveillance data obtained by conventional means has not been fully assessed.

Methods

From October 2016 to June 2018, air was sampled weekly from a university campus in Hong Kong. Viral genomes were detected and quantified by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression models were fitted to examine the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of ecological and environmental factors associated with the detection of virus-laden airborne particles.

Results

Influenza A (16.9% [117/694]) and influenza B (4.5% [31/694]) viruses were detected at higher frequencies in air than rhinovirus (2.2% [6/270]), respiratory syncytial virus (0.4% [1/270]), or human coronaviruses (0% [0/270]). Multivariate analyses showed that increased crowdedness (aOR, 2.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.5–3.8]; P < .001) and higher indoor temperature (aOR, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1–1.3]; P < .001) were associated with detection of influenza airborne particles, but absolute humidity was not (aOR, 0.9 [95% CI, .7–1.1]; P = .213). Higher copies of influenza viral genome were detected from airborne particles >4 μm in spring and <1 μm in autumn. Influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses that caused epidemics during the study period were detected in air prior to observing increased influenza activities in the community.

Conclusions

Air sampling as a surveillance tool for monitoring influenza activity at public locations may provide early detection signals on influenza viruses that circulate in the community.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/70/5/850/5432328

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

March 24, 2020 at 8:45 pm

Severe Illnesses Associated With Outbreaks of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza in Adults

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 2020 V.70 N.5 P.773–779

Background

Recent reports have described the contribution of adult respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections to the use of advanced healthcare resources and death.

Methods

Data regarding patients aged ≥18 years admitted to any of Maryland’s 50 acute-care hospitals were evaluated over 12 consecutive years (2001–2013). We examined RSV and influenza (flu) surveillance data from the US National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and used this information to define RSV and flu outbreak periods in the Maryland area. Outbreak periods consisted of consecutive individual weeks during which at least 10% of RSV and/or flu diagnostic tests were positive. We examined relationships of RSV and flu outbreaks to occurrence of 4 advanced medical outcomes (hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, intubated mechanical ventilation, and death) due to medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI).

Results

Occurrences of all 4 MAARI-related hospital advanced medical outcomes were consistently greater for all adult ages during RSV, flu, and combined RSV–flu outbreak periods compared to nonoutbreak periods and tended to be greatest in adults aged ≥65 years during combined RSV–flu outbreak periods. Rate ratios for all 4 MAARI-related advanced medical outcomes ranged from 1.04 to 1.38 during the RSV, flu, or combined RSV–flu outbreaks compared to the nonoutbreak periods, with all 95% lower confidence limits >1.

Conclusions

Both RSV and flu outbreaks were associated with surges in MAARI-related advanced medical outcomes (hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, intubated mechanical ventilation, and death) for adults of all ages.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/70/5/773/5427067

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

March 24, 2020 at 8:43 pm

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine October 1, 2019 V.200 N.7

Background

This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

Methods

A multidisciplinary panel conducted pragmatic systematic reviews of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations.

Results

The panel addressed 16 specific areas for recommendations spanning questions of diagnostic testing, determination of site of care, selection of initial empiric antibiotic therapy, and subsequent management decisions. Although some recommendations remain unchanged from the 2007 guideline, the availability of results from new therapeutic trials and epidemiological investigations led to revised recommendations for empiric treatment strategies and additional management decisions.

Conclusions

The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected diagnostic and treatment strategies for adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

FULL TEXT

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST#_i6

PDF

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

January 21, 2020 at 3:54 pm

Baloxavir marboxil for uncomplicated influenza in adults and adolescents.

N Engl J Med 2018 Sep 6; 379:913.

Hayden FG et al.

BACKGROUND

Baloxavir marboxil is a selective inhibitor of influenza cap-dependent endonuclease. It has shown therapeutic activity in preclinical models of influenza A and B virus infections, including strains resistant to current antiviral agents.

METHODS

We conducted two randomized, double-blind, controlled trials involving otherwise healthy outpatients with acute uncomplicated influenza. After a dose-ranging (10 to 40 mg) placebo-controlled trial, we undertook a placebo- and oseltamivir-controlled trial of single, weight-based doses of baloxavir (40 or 80 mg) in patients 12 to 64 years of age during the 2016–2017 season. The dose of oseltamivir was 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. The primary efficacy end point was the time to alleviation of influenza symptoms in the intention-to-treat infected population.

RESULTS

In the phase 2 trial, the median time to alleviation of influenza symptoms was 23.4 to 28.2 hours shorter in the baloxavir groups than in the placebo group (P<0.05). In the phase 3 trial, the intention-to-treat infected population included 1064 patients; 84.8 to 88.1% of patients in each group had influenza A(H3N2) infection. The median time to alleviation of symptoms was 53.7 hours (95% confidence interval [CI], 49.5 to 58.5) with baloxavir, as compared with 80.2 hours (95% CI, 72.6 to 87.1) with placebo (P<0.001). The time to alleviation of symptoms was similar with baloxavir and oseltamivir. Baloxavir was associated with greater reductions in viral load 1 day after initiation of the regimen than placebo or oseltamivir. Adverse events were reported in 20.7% of baloxavir recipients, 24.6% of placebo recipients, and 24.8% of oseltamivir recipients. The emergence of polymerase acidic protein variants with I38T/M/F substitutions conferring reduced susceptibility to baloxavir occurred in 2.2% and 9.7% of baloxavir recipients in the phase 2 trial and phase 3 trial, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Single-dose baloxavir was without evident safety concerns, was superior to placebo in alleviating influenza symptoms, and was superior to both oseltamivir and placebo in reducing the viral load 1 day after initiation of the trial regimen in patients with uncomplicated influenza. Evidence for the development of decreased susceptibility to baloxavir after treatment was also observed. (Funded by Shionogi; JapicCTI number, 153090, and CAPSTONE-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02954354. opens in new tab.)

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1716197

 

FDA approves new drug to treat influenza [press release].

Silver Spring, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Oct 24, 2018. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm624226.htm

December 27, 2019 at 8:23 am

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. October 1, 2019  V.200 N.7  e45-e67.

Metlay JP, Waterer GW, Long AC, Anzueto A, Brozek J, Crothers K, et al.

Background

This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

Methods

A multidisciplinary panel conducted pragmatic systematic reviews of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations.

Results

The panel addressed 16 specific areas for recommendations spanning questions of diagnostic testing, determination of site of care, selection of initial empiric antibiotic therapy, and subsequent management decisions. Although some recommendations remain unchanged from the 2007 guideline, the availability of results from new therapeutic trials and epidemiological investigations led to revised recommendations for empiric treatment strategies and additional management decisions.

Conclusions

The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected diagnostic and treatment strategies for adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

 

Este documento proporciona pautas de práctica clínica basadas en evidencia sobre el manejo de pacientes adultos con NAC.

Métodos

Un panel multidisciplinario realizó revisiones sistemáticas pragmáticas de la investigación relevante y aplicó la metodología de calificación de recomendaciones, evaluación, desarrollo y evaluación para recomendaciones clínicas.

Resultados

El panel abordó 16 áreas específicas para recomendaciones que abarcan preguntas sobre pruebas de diagnóstico, determinación del sitio de atención, selección de terapia ATB empírica inicial y decisiones de manejo posteriores. Aunque algunas recomendaciones permanecen sin cambios con respecto a la guía de 2007, la disponibilidad de resultados de nuevos ensayos terapéuticos e investigaciones epidemiológicas condujo a recomendaciones revisadas para estrategias de tratamiento empírico y decisiones de manejo adicionales.

Conclusiones

El panel formuló y proporcionó la justificación de las recomendaciones sobre estrategias seleccionadas de diagnóstico y tratamiento para pacientes adultos con NAC.

FULL TEXT

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST#_i6

PDF

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

November 15, 2019 at 7:59 am

Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia

Am J Respir Crit Care Med October 1, 2019 V.200 N.7 P.e45–e67

An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America

FULL TEXT

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

PDF

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST

November 10, 2019 at 11:36 am

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