Posts filed under ‘Inmunizaciones’

Fiebre de origen desconocido en pacientes HIV positivos

ANALES DE MEDICINA INTERNA (Madrid), 2001 V.18 N.4 P.181-186

BARBA, J. GÓMEZ-RODRIGO, J. MARCO, P. RONDÓN, G. EROLES,

LÓPEZ-VARAS, R. TORRES

Departamento de Medicina Interna y Enfermedades Infecciosas. Hospital Severo Ochoa.

Leganés. Madrid

RESUMEN

Objetivos

Describir la presentación clínica y la utilidad de los de tests diagnósticos habitualmente recomendados en el estudio de la fiebre de origen desconocido (FOD) en los pacientes VIH positivos.

Pacientes y métodos

Incluimos en el estudio a los 54 pacientes con infección por el VIH que ingresaron en nuestro Hospital por FOD durante un periodo de 23 meses. La FOD fue definida de acuerdo con los criterios modificados de Petersdorf´s.

Resultados

La causa de la fiebre se identificó en 48 casos (89%). La tuberculosis, la micobacteriosis atípica y la leishmaniasis pueden explicar el 68% de los casos. El aspirado de médula ósea, la punción aspiración o la biopsia de los ganglios linfáticos y los cultivos para micobacterias fueron las pruebas diagnósticas más rentables.

Conclusiones

La infección por micobacterias debe ser el primer diagnóstico de sospecha en los pacientes VIH positivos con FOD. Es posible precedir el diagnóstico de tuberculosis con una alta precisión (90,5%) con un modelo de regresión logística basado en datos clínicos y analíticos fácilmente obtenibles.

PDF

http://scielo.isciii.es/pdf/ami/v18n4/original2.pdf

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November 21, 2017 at 8:41 am

Emergence of Bordetella holmesii as a Causative Agent of Whooping Cough, Barcelona, Spain

Emerging Infectious Diseases November 2017 V.23 N.11

Alba Mir-Cros, Gema Codina, M. Teresa Martín-Gómez, Anna Fàbrega, Xavier Martínez, Mireia Jané, Diego Van Esso, Thais Cornejo, Carlos Rodrigo, Magda Campins, Tomàs Pumarola, and Juan José González-LópezComments to Author

Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain (A. Mir-Cros, G. Codina, M.T. Martín-Gómez, A. Fàbrega, X. Martínez, T. Cornejo, C. Rodrigo, M. Campins, T. Pumarola, J.J. González-López); Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (A. Mir-Cros, G. Codina, C. Rodrigo, M. Campins, T. Pumarola, J.J. González-López); Public Health Agency of Catalonia, Barcelona (M. Jané); Primary Care Health Centre Service ‘Muntanya,’ Barcelona (D. Van Esso)

We describe the detection of Bordetella holmesii as a cause of whooping cough in Spain. Prevalence was 3.9% in 2015, doubling to 8.8% in 2016. This emergence raises concern regarding the contribution of B. holmesii to the reemergence of whooping cough and the effectiveness of the pertussis vaccine.

PDF

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/11/pdfs/17-0960.pdf

October 18, 2017 at 8:24 am

Sustained Immunogenicity of 2-dose Human Papillomavirus 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted Vaccine Schedules in Girls Aged 9–14 Years: A Randomized Trial

Journal of Infectious Diseases June 1, 2017 V.215 N.11 P.1711–1719

Li-Min Huang; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Chiu Cheng-Hsun; Tang Ren-Bin; Tino Schwarz …

Background.

We previously reported the noninferiority 1 month after the last dose of 2-dose human papillomavirus 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted (AS04-HPV-16/18) vaccine schedules at months 0 and 6 (2D_M0,6) and months 0 and 12 (2D_M0,12) in girls aged 9–14 years compared with a 3-dose schedule at months 0, 1, and 6 (3D_M0,1,6) in women aged 15–25 years. Here, we report the results at study end (month 36 [M36]).

Methods.

Girls were randomized 1:1 and received 2 vaccine doses either 6 months (2D_M0,6) or 12 months apart (2D_M0,12); women received 3 doses at months 0, 1, and 6 (3D_M0,1,6). Endpoints included noninferiority of HPV-16/18 antibodies for 2D_M0,6 versus 3D_M0,1,6; 2D_M0,12 versus 3D_M0,1,6; and 2D_M0,12 versus 2D_M0,6; and assessment of neutralizing antibodies, T cells, B cells, and safety.

Results.

At M36, the 2D_M0,6 and 2D_M0,12 schedules remained noninferior to the 3D_M0,1,6 schedule in terms of seroconversion rates and 3D/2D geometric mean titers for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18. All schedules elicited sustained immune responses up to M36.

Conclusions.

Both 2-dose schedules in young girls remained noninferior to the 3-dose schedule in women up to study conclusion at M36. The AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine administered as a 2-dose schedule was immunogenic and well tolerated in young girls.

PDF

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September 27, 2017 at 8:48 am

Risk of Recurrence of Adverse Events Following Immunization: A Systematic Review

Pediatrics September 2017 V.140 N.3

Joseline Guetsop Zafack, Gaston De Serres, Marilou Kiely, Marie-Claude Gariépy, Isabelle Rouleau, Karina Anne-Marie Top, for the Canadian Immunization Research Network

Abstract

CONTEXT

Reimmunizing patients who had an adverse event following immunization (AEFI) is sometimes a challenge because there are limited data on the risk and severity of AEFI recurrence.

OBJECTIVE

To summarize the literature on the risk of AEFI recurrence.

DATA SOURCES

PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library.

STUDY SELECTION

We included articles in English or French published before September 30, 2016. Articles were selected if they estimated the risk of AEFI recurrence in at least 5 individuals. Studies with experimental vaccines were excluded.

DATA EXTRACTION

Data on study design, setting, population, vaccines, and AEFI recurrence were extracted.

RESULTS

Twenty-nine articles were included. Among patients with a history of hypotonic hyporesponsive episode (n = 398), anaphylaxis (n = 133), or seizures (n = 60) who were reimmunized, events recurred in 0% to 0.8%. Allergic-like events recurred in 30 of 594 reimmunized patients. Fever recurred in 0% to 84% of 836 reimmunized patients, depending on the vaccine and dose number. Among children with extensive limb swelling after the fourth dose of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, recurrence was higher when the fifth dose was given withthe full-antigen formulation (78%) compared with the reduced-antigen formulation (53%, P = .02)

LIMITATIONS

Many studies, included few patients, and those with severe AEFIs were often not reimmunized.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite vaccines being administered to millions of people annually, there are few studies in which researchers evaluated AEFI recurrence. Published studies suggest that reimmunization is usually safe. However in these studies, severe cases were often not reimmunized.

FULL TEXT

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/3/e20163707

PDF

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/140/3/e20163707.full.pdf

September 25, 2017 at 8:22 am

Recommendations for prevention of surgical site infection in adult elective arthroplasty.

Medicina (B Aires). 2017;77(2):143-157.

[Article in Spanish]

Chuluyán JC1, Vila A2, Chattás AL3, Montero M3, Pensotti C4, Tosello C5, Sánchez M6, Vera Ocampo C7, Kremer G8, Quirós R8, Benchetrit GA9, Pérez CF10, Terusi AL11, Nacinovich F12.

Author information

1 Grupo de Trabajo Infectología, Hospital General de Agudos Dr. T. álvarez, Argentina. E-mail: jcchulu@gmail.com

2 Servicio de Infectología, Hospital Italiano de Mendoza, Mendoza, Argentina.

3 Hospital General de Agudos Dr. Pirovano, Argentina.

4 Clínica Monte Grande, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

5 Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

6 Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

7 Sanatorio Dupuytren, Argentina.

8 Hospital Universitario Austral, Argentina.

9 Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas A. Lanari, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

10 Policlínico del Docente-Centro Médico Huésped, Argentina.

11 Instituto César Milstein, Argentina.

12 Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires, Centros Médicos Dr. Stamboulian, Argentina.

Abstract

Surgical site infections complicating orthopedic implant surgeries prolong hospital stay and increase risk of readmission, hospitalization costs and mortality.

These recommendations are aimed at:

(i) optimizing compliance and incorporating habits in all surgery phases by detecting risk factors for surgical site infections which are potentially correctable or modifiable; and

(ii) optimizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis as well as intraoperative and postoperative care.

PDF

http://www.medicinabuenosaires.com/PMID/28463223.pdf

September 25, 2017 at 7:35 am

Elimination of Perinatal Hepatitis B: Providing the First Vaccine Dose Within 24 Hours of Birth

Pediatrics September 2017 V. 140 N.3

COMMITTEE ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES, COMMITTEE ON FETUS AND NEWBORN

Kristi Watterberg, MD, FAAP, Chairperson, William Benitz, MD, FAAP, Ivan Hand, MD, FAAP, Eric Eichenwald, MD, FAAP, Brenda Poindexter, MD, FAAP, Dan L. Stewart, MD, FAAP, Susan W. Aucott, MD, FAAP, Karen M. Puopolo, MD, PhD, FAAP, Jay P. Goldsmith, MD, FAAP

Abstract

After the introduction of the hepatitis B vaccine in the United States in 1982, a greater than 90% reduction in new infections was achieved. However, approximately 1000 new cases of perinatal hepatitis B infection are still identified annually in the United States. Prevention of perinatal hepatitis B relies on the proper and timely identification of infants born to mothers who are hepatitis B surface antigen positive and to mothers with unknown status to ensure administration of appropriate postexposure immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccine and immune globulin. To reduce the incidence of perinatal hepatitis B transmission further, the American Academy of Pediatrics endorses the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that all newborn infants with a birth weight of greater than or equal to 2000 g receive hepatitis B vaccine by 24 hours of age.

FULL TEXT

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/3/e20171870

PDF

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/140/3/e20171870.full.pdf

September 22, 2017 at 8:02 am

Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults Hospitalized in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study

Open Forum Infectious Diseases April 2017 V.4 N.2

Sara Tomczyk; Seema Jain; Anna M Bramley; Wesley H Self; Evan J Anderson …

Background

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) 2007 guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)/American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommend a respiratory fluoroquinolone or beta-lactam plus macrolide as first-line antibiotics for adults hospitalized with CAP. Few studies have assessed guideline-concordant antibiotic use for patients hospitalized with CAP after the 2007 IDSA/ATS guidelines. We examine antibiotics prescribed and associated factors in adults hospitalized with CAP.

Methods

From January 2010 to June 2012, adults hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled in a prospective Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community study across 5 US hospitals. Patients were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire, and medical charts were reviewed. Antibiotics prescribed were classified according to defined nonrecommended CAP antibiotics. We assessed factors associated with nonrecommended CAP antibiotics using logistic regression.

Results

Among enrollees, 1843 of 1874 (98%) ward and 440 of 446 (99%) ICU patients received ≥1 antibiotic ≤24 hours after admission. Ward patients were prescribed a respiratory fluoroquinolone alone (n = 613; 33%), or beta-lactam plus macrolide (n = 365; 19%), beta-lactam alone (n = 240; 13%), among other antibiotics, including vancomycin (n = 235; 13%) or piperacillin/tazobactam (n = 157; 8%) ≤24 hours after admission. Ward patients with known risk for healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP), recent outpatient antibiotic use, and in-hospital antibiotic use <6 hours after admission were significantly more likely to receive nonrecommended CAP antibiotics.

Conclusions

Although more than half of ward patients received antibiotics concordant with IDSA/ATS guidelines, a number received nonrecommended CAP antibiotics, including vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam; risk factors for HCAP, recent outpatient antibiotic, and rapid inpatient antibiotic use contributed to this. This hypothesis-generating descriptive epidemiology analysis could help inform antibiotic stewardship efforts, reinforces the need to harmonize guidelines for CAP and HCAP, and highlights the need for improved diagnostics to better equip clinicians.

PDF

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September 3, 2017 at 6:54 pm

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