Posts filed under ‘Medicina del viajero’

ARGENTINA – Confirmación de tres nuevos casos de sarampión en niños. Alto riesgo de transmisibilidad

ACTUALIZACIÓN EPIDEMIOLÓGICA 13/0/2019 – Ministerio salud Nación

En virtud de la situación epidemiológica regional y local respecto a la confirmación de tres casos de

sarampión en niños residentes de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires y la Provincia de Buenos Aires, la

Secretaria de Gobierno de Salud emite la siguiente actualización…..

TEXTO COMPLETO

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/sarampion_13_septiembre_2019.pdf

 

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September 14, 2019 at 9:39 am

Sep. 11, 2019 Confirmación de dos casos de sarampión en viajeros. Alto riesgo de transmisibilidad Ministerio Salud Argentina

ACTUALIZACION EPIDEMIOLOGICA

En virtud de la situación del brote de sarampión en Brasil y otros países de la región y el mundo, y la confirmación de dos casos en turistas extranjeros arribados a España provenientes de Argentina con diagnóstico de sarampión, la Secretaria de Gobierno de Salud emite la siguiente actualización …

Boletín completo

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/sarampion_alerta-11-09-2019.pdf

September 12, 2019 at 7:54 am

Confirmación de caso de sarampión en Ciudad de Buenos Aires con antecedente de viaje a Brasil

ALERTA EPIDEMIOLÓGICA 4/Septiembre/2019 – SE 36

En virtud de la situación de brote de sarampión en Brasil y otros países de la región y el mundo, y la confirmación de un caso en un ciudadano argentino con antecedente de viaje, la Secretaría de Gobierno de Salud emite el presente alerta:

SITUACIÓN ACTUAL

Se confirmó un caso de sarampión en un hombre de 44 años residente en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, atendido en efector privado, con antecedente de viaje a Brasil, que comenzó con fiebre el día 10 de agosto, agregando exantema cuatro días después. El caso se confirmó por serología (IgM positiva en suero) y seroconversión de IgG, así como RT-PCR positiva en orina. Las muestras fueron procesadas por el efector privado y se confirmaron en el Laboratorio Nacional de Referencia ANLIS Carlos G. Malbrán. Se encuentran en desarrollo las pruebas para identificación de genotipo y linaje viral. La fuente de infección está en investigación. Se iniciaron acciones de prevención y control en los contactos del caso, quienes se encuentran en seguimiento…

ARTICULO COMPLETO

https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/2019-09-04-alerta-sarampion.pdf

September 9, 2019 at 3:10 pm

Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks — United States, 2009–2017

MMWR  June 28, 2019  V.68 N.25 P.568–572

Radhika Gharpure, DVM1,2; Ariana Perez, MPH1,3; Allison D. Miller, MPH1,4; Mary E. Wikswo, MPH5; Rachel Silver, MPH1,3; Michele C. Hlavsa, MPH1

Summary

What is already known about this topic?

Cryptosporidium is the leading cause of outbreaks of diarrhea linked to water and the third leading cause of diarrhea associated with animal contact in the United States.

What is added by this report?

During 2009–2017, 444 cryptosporidiosis outbreaks, resulting in 7,465 cases were reported by 40 states and Puerto Rico. The number of reported outbreaks has increased an average of approximately 13% per year. Leading causes include swallowing contaminated water in pools or water playgrounds, contact with infected cattle, and contact with infected persons in child care settings.

What are the implications for public health practice?

To prevent cryptosporidiosis outbreaks, CDC recommends not swimming or attending child care if ill with diarrhea and recommends hand washing after contact with animals….

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6825a3.htm#contribAff

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6825a3-H.pdf

 

July 1, 2019 at 11:03 am

American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease – Sexual transmission

International Journal of Infectious Diseases April 2019 V.81 N.4 P.81-84

Clever Gomes, Adriana B. Almeida, Ana C. Rosa, Perla F. Araujo, Antonio R.L. Teixeira

Highlights

  • Trypanosoma cruzi infection can be transmitted sexually from males and females to naïve mates.
  • T. cruzi parasites were detected in semen ejaculates from individuals with Chagas disease by nucleic acid techniques.
  • Semen aliquots from humans with Chagas disease instilled into the vagina of naïve female mice resulted in T. cruzi infections.
  • Breeding T. cruzi-infected male and female mice vertically transmitted the infection to progeny mice.

Objective

To contribute to the discussion on the research findings indicating the sexual transmission of American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease in humans.

Methods

A review of the literature was performed to investigate the routes of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites and to evaluate the distribution of Chagas disease, which is now found across five continents.

Results

The epidemiological profile of American trypanosomiasis, which is still considered a neglected disease of the poor people of Latin America, has changed over time. A family-based study demonstrated that the blood protozoan T. cruzi can be transmitted sexually from infected males and females to naïve mates.

Conclusions

Evidence that Chagas disease can be transmitted sexually, coupled with the migration of individuals with Chagas disease to previously non-endemic countries and increased travel to endemic countries, has implications for public health. Improved screening of blood supplies and prenatal care are required to prevent congenital spread.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/pdf

June 30, 2019 at 12:18 pm

Meningococcal Disease Among College-Aged Young Adults: 2014–2016

Pediatrics January 2019  V.143  N.1

BACKGROUND:

Freshman college students living in residence halls have previously been identified as being at an increased risk for meningococcal disease. In this evaluation, we assess the incidence and characteristics of meningococcal disease in college-aged young adults in the United States.

METHODS:

The incidence and relative risk (RR) of meningococcal disease among college students compared with noncollege students aged 18 to 24 years during 2014–2016 were calculated by using data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance. Differences in demographic characteristics and clinical features of meningococcal disease cases were assessed. Available meningococcal isolates were characterized by using slide agglutination, polymerase chain reaction, and whole genome sequencing.

RESULTS:

From 2014 to 2016, 166 cases of meningococcal disease occurred in persons aged 18 to 24 years, with an average annual incidence of 0.17 cases per 100 000 population. Six serogroup B outbreaks were identified on college campuses, accounting for 30% of serogroup B cases in college students during this period. The RR of serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) disease in college students versus noncollege students was 3.54 (95% confidence interval: 2.21–5.41), and the RR of serogroups C, W, and Y combined was 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.27–1.14). The most common serogroup B clonal complexes identified were CC32/ET-5 and CC41/44 lineage 3.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the incidence is low, among 18- to 24-year-olds, college students are at an increased risk for sporadic and outbreak-associated MenB disease. Providers, college students, and parents should be aware of the availability of MenB vaccines.

FULL TEXT

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/143/1/e20182130

PDF

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/143/1/e20182130.full.pdf

June 17, 2019 at 6:59 pm

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 5, 2019 V.68 N.6 P.e1-e47.   

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Uyeki TM1, Bernstein HH2, Bradley JS3,4, Englund JA5, File TM6, Fry AM1, Gravenstein S7, Hayden FG8, Harper SA9, Hirshon JM10, Ison MG11, Johnston BL12, Knight SL13, McGeer A14, Riley LE15, Wolfe CR16, Alexander PE17,18, Pavia AT19.

Abstract

These clinical practice guidelines are an update of the guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in 2009, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This document addresses new information regarding diagnostic testing, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal influenza. It is intended for use by primary care clinicians, obstetricians, emergency medicine providers, hospitalists, laboratorians, and infectious disease specialists, as well as other clinicians managing patients with suspected or laboratory-confirmed influenza. The guidelines consider the care of children and adults, including special populations such as pregnant and postpartum women and immunocompromised patients.

Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2018.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/6/e1/5251935

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

May 1, 2019 at 6:23 pm

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