Posts filed under ‘Medicina del viajero’

Cryptosporidiosis Outbreaks — United States, 2009–2017

MMWR  June 28, 2019  V.68 N.25 P.568–572

Radhika Gharpure, DVM1,2; Ariana Perez, MPH1,3; Allison D. Miller, MPH1,4; Mary E. Wikswo, MPH5; Rachel Silver, MPH1,3; Michele C. Hlavsa, MPH1

Summary

What is already known about this topic?

Cryptosporidium is the leading cause of outbreaks of diarrhea linked to water and the third leading cause of diarrhea associated with animal contact in the United States.

What is added by this report?

During 2009–2017, 444 cryptosporidiosis outbreaks, resulting in 7,465 cases were reported by 40 states and Puerto Rico. The number of reported outbreaks has increased an average of approximately 13% per year. Leading causes include swallowing contaminated water in pools or water playgrounds, contact with infected cattle, and contact with infected persons in child care settings.

What are the implications for public health practice?

To prevent cryptosporidiosis outbreaks, CDC recommends not swimming or attending child care if ill with diarrhea and recommends hand washing after contact with animals….

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6825a3.htm#contribAff

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6825a3-H.pdf

 

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July 1, 2019 at 11:03 am

American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease – Sexual transmission

International Journal of Infectious Diseases April 2019 V.81 N.4 P.81-84

Clever Gomes, Adriana B. Almeida, Ana C. Rosa, Perla F. Araujo, Antonio R.L. Teixeira

Highlights

  • Trypanosoma cruzi infection can be transmitted sexually from males and females to naïve mates.
  • T. cruzi parasites were detected in semen ejaculates from individuals with Chagas disease by nucleic acid techniques.
  • Semen aliquots from humans with Chagas disease instilled into the vagina of naïve female mice resulted in T. cruzi infections.
  • Breeding T. cruzi-infected male and female mice vertically transmitted the infection to progeny mice.

Objective

To contribute to the discussion on the research findings indicating the sexual transmission of American trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease in humans.

Methods

A review of the literature was performed to investigate the routes of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites and to evaluate the distribution of Chagas disease, which is now found across five continents.

Results

The epidemiological profile of American trypanosomiasis, which is still considered a neglected disease of the poor people of Latin America, has changed over time. A family-based study demonstrated that the blood protozoan T. cruzi can be transmitted sexually from infected males and females to naïve mates.

Conclusions

Evidence that Chagas disease can be transmitted sexually, coupled with the migration of individuals with Chagas disease to previously non-endemic countries and increased travel to endemic countries, has implications for public health. Improved screening of blood supplies and prenatal care are required to prevent congenital spread.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30032-3/pdf

June 30, 2019 at 12:18 pm

Meningococcal Disease Among College-Aged Young Adults: 2014–2016

Pediatrics January 2019  V.143  N.1

BACKGROUND:

Freshman college students living in residence halls have previously been identified as being at an increased risk for meningococcal disease. In this evaluation, we assess the incidence and characteristics of meningococcal disease in college-aged young adults in the United States.

METHODS:

The incidence and relative risk (RR) of meningococcal disease among college students compared with noncollege students aged 18 to 24 years during 2014–2016 were calculated by using data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance. Differences in demographic characteristics and clinical features of meningococcal disease cases were assessed. Available meningococcal isolates were characterized by using slide agglutination, polymerase chain reaction, and whole genome sequencing.

RESULTS:

From 2014 to 2016, 166 cases of meningococcal disease occurred in persons aged 18 to 24 years, with an average annual incidence of 0.17 cases per 100 000 population. Six serogroup B outbreaks were identified on college campuses, accounting for 30% of serogroup B cases in college students during this period. The RR of serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) disease in college students versus noncollege students was 3.54 (95% confidence interval: 2.21–5.41), and the RR of serogroups C, W, and Y combined was 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.27–1.14). The most common serogroup B clonal complexes identified were CC32/ET-5 and CC41/44 lineage 3.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the incidence is low, among 18- to 24-year-olds, college students are at an increased risk for sporadic and outbreak-associated MenB disease. Providers, college students, and parents should be aware of the availability of MenB vaccines.

FULL TEXT

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/143/1/e20182130

PDF

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/143/1/e20182130.full.pdf

June 17, 2019 at 6:59 pm

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Clinical Infectious Diseases March 5, 2019 V.68 N.6 P.e1-e47.   

Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America: 2018 Update on Diagnosis, Treatment, Chemoprophylaxis, and Institutional Outbreak Management of Seasonal Influenza.

Uyeki TM1, Bernstein HH2, Bradley JS3,4, Englund JA5, File TM6, Fry AM1, Gravenstein S7, Hayden FG8, Harper SA9, Hirshon JM10, Ison MG11, Johnston BL12, Knight SL13, McGeer A14, Riley LE15, Wolfe CR16, Alexander PE17,18, Pavia AT19.

Abstract

These clinical practice guidelines are an update of the guidelines published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) in 2009, prior to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This document addresses new information regarding diagnostic testing, treatment and chemoprophylaxis with antiviral medications, and issues related to institutional outbreak management for seasonal influenza. It is intended for use by primary care clinicians, obstetricians, emergency medicine providers, hospitalists, laboratorians, and infectious disease specialists, as well as other clinicians managing patients with suspected or laboratory-confirmed influenza. The guidelines consider the care of children and adults, including special populations such as pregnant and postpartum women and immunocompromised patients.

Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2018.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/68/6/e1/5251935

PDF (CLIC en PDF)

May 1, 2019 at 6:23 pm

Imported toxin-producing cutaneous diphtheria— Minnesota, Washington, and New Mexico, 2015–2018.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep March 29, 2019 V.68 N.12 P.281-284

Griffith J et al.

Summary

What is already known about this topic?

Cutaneous diphtheria has not been notifiable in the United States since 1980, and U.S. disease incidence data are limited.

What is added by this report?

Toxin-producing Corynebacterium diphtheriae was identified in cutaneous wounds from four U.S. residents after return from international travel. Public health response for toxin-producing diphtheria includes treating patients, providing chemoprophylaxis to close contacts, testing patients and close contacts for C. diphtheriae carriage, and providing diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine to incompletely immunized patients and close contacts.

What are the implications for public health practice?

Cutaneous toxin-producing diphtheria should be considered in travelers with wound infections who have returned from countries with endemic disease to permit prompt public health response and prevent disease transmission.

 

From September 2015 to March 2018, CDC confirmed four cases of cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxin-producing Corynebacterium diphtheriae in patients from Minnesota (two), Washington (one), and New Mexico (one). All patients had recently returned to the United States after travel to countries where diphtheria is endemic. C. diphtheriae infection was not clinically suspected in any of the patients; treating institutions detected the organism through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) testing of wound-derived coryneform isolates. MALDI-TOF is a rapid screening platform that uses mass spectrometry to identify bacterial pathogens. State public health laboratories confirmed C. diphtheriae through culture and sent isolates to CDC’s Pertussis and Diphtheria Laboratory for biotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, and toxin production testing. All isolates were identified as toxin-producing C. diphtheriae. The recommended public health response for cutaneous diphtheria is similar to that for respiratory diphtheria and includes treating the index patient with antibiotics, identifying close contacts and observing them for development of diphtheria, providing chemoprophylaxis to close contacts, testing patients and close contacts for C. diphtheriae carriage in the nose and throat, and providing diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine to incompletely immunized patients and close contacts. This report summarizes the patient clinical information and response efforts conducted by the Minnesota, Washington, and New Mexico state health departments and CDC and emphasizes that health care providers should consider cutaneous diphtheria as a diagnosis in travelers with wound infections who have returned from countries with endemic diphtheria.

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6812a2.htm?s_cid=mm6812a2_w

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6812a2-H.pdf

April 18, 2019 at 9:57 am

Increased risk of chikungunya infection in travellers to Thailand during ongoing outbreak in tourist areas: cases imported to Europe and the Middle East, early 2019.

EuroSurveillance  March 07, 2019 V.24 N.10

Rapid communication

Emilie Javelle1,2,3, Simin-Aysel Florescu4, Hilmir Asgeirsson5,6, Shilan Jmor7, Gilles Eperon8, Eyal Leshem9, Johannes Blum10, Israel Molina11, Vanessa Field7,12, Nancy Pietroski13, Carole Eldin2, Victoria Johnston7, Ioana Ani Cotar14, Corneliu Popescu4, Davidson H Hamer15,16, Philippe Gautret2,3

Since the start of 2019, the EuroTravNet/GeoSentinel and TropNet data collection networks for the surveillance of travel-related morbidity have identified nine patients with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection imported from Thailand to Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom (UK), Romania, Israel and France.

In comparison, the last CHIKV infection reported to EuroTravNet/GeoSentinel in travellers from Thailand was a suspected case in Romania in January 2018.

Only three other cases were reported to this network during the past 3 years from Thailand, and none in travellers returning to Europe.

Here, we present the clinical and travel data of eight travellers notified to EuroTravNet/GeoSentinel and one notified to TropNet with confirmed chikungunya disease imported from Thailand within 2 months.

FULL TEXT

https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.10.1900146

PDF (CLIC DOWNLOAD)

April 7, 2019 at 12:53 pm

Prior dengue virus infection and risk of Zika: A pediatric cohort in Nicaragua

Public Library of Science – Medicine PLOS Medicine

Background

Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged in northeast Brazil in 2015 and spread rapidly across the Americas, in populations that have been largely exposed to dengue virus (DENV). The impact of prior DENV infection on ZIKV infection outcome remains unclear. To study this potential impact, we analyzed the large 2016 Zika epidemic in Managua, Nicaragua, in a pediatric cohort with well-characterized DENV infection histories.

Methods and findings

Symptomatic ZIKV infections (Zika cases) were identified by real-time reverse transcription PCR and serology in a community-based cohort study that follows approximately 3,700 children aged 2–14 years old. Annual blood samples were used to identify clinically inapparent ZIKV infections using a novel, well-characterized serological assay. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to examine the relation between prior DENV infection and incidence of symptomatic and inapparent ZIKV infection. The generalized-growth method was used to estimate the effective reproduction number. From January 1, 2016, to February 28, 2017, 560 symptomatic ZIKV infections and 1,356 total ZIKV infections (symptomatic and inapparent) were identified, for an overall incidence of 14.0 symptomatic infections (95% CI: 12.9, 15.2) and 36.5 total infections (95% CI: 34.7, 38.6) per 100 person-years. Effective reproduction number estimates ranged from 3.3 to 3.4, depending on the ascending wave period. Incidence of symptomatic and total ZIKV infections was higher in females and older children. Analysis of the effect of prior DENV infection was performed on 3,027 participants with documented DENV infection histories, of which 743 (24.5%) had experienced at least 1 prior DENV infection during cohort follow-up. Prior DENV infection was inversely associated with risk of symptomatic ZIKV infection in the total cohort population (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.81; p < 0.005) and with risk of symptomatic presentation given ZIKV infection (IRR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.86) when adjusted for age, sex, and recent DENV infection (1–2 years before ZIKV infection). Recent DENV infection was significantly associated with decreased risk of symptomatic ZIKV infection when adjusted for age and sex, but not when adjusted for prior DENV infection. Prior or recent DENV infection did not affect the rate of total ZIKV infections. Our findings are limited to a pediatric population and constrained by the epidemiology of the site.

Conclusions

These findings support that prior DENV infection may protect individuals from symptomatic Zika. More research is needed to address the possible immunological mechanism(s) of cross-protection between ZIKV and DENV and whether DENV immunity also modulates other ZIKV infection outcomes such as neurological or congenital syndromes.

FULL TEXT

https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002726

PDF

https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002726&type=printable

February 13, 2019 at 10:09 pm

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