Posts filed under ‘Prevencion y Control de Infecciones’

Streptococcus salivarius Prosthetic Joint Infection following Dental Cleaning despite Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

Case Rep Infect Dis. April 21, 2019   

Olson LB1, Turner DJ2, Cox GM3, Hostler CJ3,4.

Author information

1 Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, USA.

3 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

4 Infectious Disease Section, Durham VA Health Care System, Durham, USA.

Abstract

We present the case of a 92-year-old man with septic arthritis of a prosthetic hip joint due to Streptococcus salivarius one week following a high-risk dental procedure despite preprocedure amoxicillin. S. salivarius is a commensal bacterium of the human oral mucosa that is an uncommon cause of bacteremia. S. salivarius has previously been described as a causative agent of infective endocarditis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis but was only recently recognized as a cause of prosthetic joint infection. This case highlights the potential pathogenicity of a common commensal bacteria and the questionable utility of prophylactic antibiotics before dental procedures to prevent periprosthetic joint infections

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6501194/pdf/CRIID2019-8109280.pdf

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August 9, 2019 at 8:26 am

Managing All the Genotypic Knowledge: Approach to a Septic Patient Colonized by Different Enterobacteriales with Unique Carbapenemases

Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. August 2019 V.63 N.8

The recent development of new antimicrobials active against carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriales (CPE) has brought new hope for the treatment of infections due to these organisms.

However, the evolving epidemiology of bacteria with carbapenemases may complicate management, as providers are faced with treating patients colonized by bacteria producing multiple carbapenemases.

Here, we present the clinical course and treatment of Raoultella planticola bacteremia in a cirrhotic patient known to be colonized with both blaKPC- and blaOXA-48-carrying organisms.

abstract

https://aac.asm.org/content/63/8/e00029-19.abstract?etoc

PDF

https://aac.asm.org/content/aac/63/8/e00029-19.full.pdf

July 27, 2019 at 10:43 am

Rates of blood cultures positive for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in Ontario: a quasi-experimental study

CMAJ Open

Jennie Johnstone, MD, PhD, Michelle E. Policarpio, MSc, Freda Lam, MPH, Kwaku Adomako, MSc, Chatura Prematunge, MSc, Emily Nadolny, MA, MPH, Ye Li, PhD, Kevin Brown, PhD, Elaine Kerr, ART, BA, Gary Garber, MD

Affiliations: Public Health Ontario (Johnstone, Policarpio, Lam, Adomako, Prematunge, Nadolny, Li, Brown, Garber); St. Joseph’s Health Centre (Johnstone); Department of Medicine (Johnstone, Garber); Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Johnstone, Li, Brown), University of Toronto; Institute for Quality Management in Healthcare (Kerr), Toronto, Ont.; Department of Medicine (Garber), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont.

Background

Some Ontario hospitals have discontinued active screening and isolation programs for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). The aim of this study was to determine whether this practice change is associated with a change in the rate of rise of VRE-positive blood cultures.

Methods

All Ontario hospitals are mandated to report VRE bacteremia. Using this publicly reported data set, we included all validated results between January 2009 and June 2015. Beginning in June 2012, some hospitals discontinued active VRE screening and isolation programs (intervention). We used an interrupted time series Poisson regression to assess the slope change in the incidence rate of VRE-positive blood cultures (primary outcome) after versus before the intervention. Hospitals that continued to screen were the comparison group. Incidence rates were adjusted for hospital type and clustering within hospital site; slope changes are presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Results

In hospitals that had ceased screening (n = 13), there was an increase in slope after screening and isolation were discontinued compared with before screening and isolation were discontinued (slope change IRR 1.25 [95% CI 1.01-1.54]). In hospitals that continued screening (n = 50), the slope was not significantly different after June 2012 compared with before June 2012 (slope change IRR 0.81 [95% CI 0.56-1.15]).

Interpretation

There was a significant increase in the rate of rise of VRE-positive blood cultures in hospitals that discontinued active VRE screening and isolation programs but not in hospitals that continued to screen and isolate. Hospitals aiming to minimize rising rates should consider maintaining active screening and isolation programs.

FULL TEXT

http://cmajopen.ca/content/5/2/E273.full

PDF

http://cmajopen.ca/content/5/2/E273.full.pdf

July 21, 2019 at 7:55 pm

Group B Streptococcus in surgical site and non-invasive bacterial infections worldwide: A systematic review and meta-analysis

International Journal of Infectious Diseases June 2019 V.83 P.116-129

Simon M. Collin, Nandini Shetty, Rebecca Guy, Victoria N. Nyaga, Ann Bull, Michael J. Richards, Tjallie I.I. van der Kooi, Mayke B.G. Koek, Mary De Almeida, Sally A. Roberts, Theresa Lamagni

Highlights

  • This review obtained data on group B Streptococcus infection from 67 countries.
  • Group B Streptococcus is implicated in a small proportion of non-invasive infections.
  • Group B Streptococcus causes 10% of caesarean section invasive surgical infections.

Objectives

The epidemiology of disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) outside pregnancy and the neonatal period is poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify the role of GBS as a cause of surgical site and non-invasive infections at all ages.

Methods

A systematic review (PROSPERO CRD42017068914) and meta-analysis of GBS as a proportion (%) of bacterial isolates from surgical site infection (SSI), skin/soft tissue infection (SSTI), urinary tract infection (UTI), and respiratory tract infection (RTI) was conducted.

Results

Seventy-four studies and data sources were included, covering 67 countries. In orthopaedic surgery, GBS accounted for 0.37% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–1.68%), 0.87% (95% CI 0.33–2.28%), and 1.46% (95% CI 0.49–4.29%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI, respectively. GBS played a more significant role as a cause of post-caesarean section SSI, detected in 2.92% (95% CI 1.51–5.55%), 1.93% (95% CI 0.97–3.81%), and 9.69% (95% CI 6.72–13.8%) of superficial, deep, and organ/space SSI. Of the SSTI isolates, 1.89% (95% CI 1.16–3.05%) were GBS. The prevalence of GBS in community and hospital UTI isolates was 1.61% (1.13–2.30%) and 0.73% (0.43–1.23%), respectively. GBS was uncommonly associated with RTI, accounting for 0.35% (95% CI 0.19–0.63%) of community and 0.27% (95% CI 0.15–0.48%) of hospital RTI isolates.

Conclusions

GBS is implicated in a small proportion of surgical site and non-invasive infections, but a substantial proportion of invasive SSI post-caesarean section.

FULL TEXT

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/fulltext

PDF

https://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(19)30187-0/pdf

 

 

June 30, 2019 at 12:21 pm

Listeriosis in Spain based on hospitalisation records, 1997 to 2015: need for greater awareness

Eurosuveillance

Listeriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the genus Listeria spp. L. monocytogenes is the major pathogenic species in both animals and humans. L. monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped organism that can grow in aerobic and anaerobic conditions [1], is widely distributed in the environment and is able to contaminate a wide variety of foods or beverages (soft cheese, deli meats, unpasteurised milk, refrigerated smoked seafood, etc.) [2]. The bacteria can multiply at refrigerator temperatures [3]; therefore, contaminated products are often kept for several days or even weeks, e.g. in the household/restaurants, and may be eaten on multiple occasions, which can complicate the identification of the incriminated food source [4].

The clinical syndromes of listeriosis include: febrile gastroenteritis, sepsis, central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of encephalitis, meningoencephalitis and focal infections such as pneumonia myo-endocarditis and septic arthritis, etc [5]. Invasive listeriosis most commonly affects pregnant women, neonates, elderly people and people with chronic conditions or weakened immune response [6]. Listeriosis has one of the highest case fatality rates among all food-borne infections; when it affects the CNS, the mortality rate is above 50% and neurological sequelae are present in more than 60% of survivors [2]. Listeriosis is also associated with fetal and neonatal death.

Worldwide, listeriosis is an emerging infection of public health concern [7]. In Europe, human listeriosis peaked in incidence during the 1980s, showed a general decline during the 1990s and stabilised in the 2000s [8]. More recent data show an increasing trend since 2008 [9]. This increase seems to be related to the ageing of the population and the increase in life expectancy of immunocompromised patients, but also to changes in the ways food is produced, stored, distributed and consumed around the world [10]. Although listeriosis is often a sporadic disease [11], large food-borne outbreaks have occurred during the last decade in Europe and the United States (US) [12]. In South Africa, an outbreak with more than 1,024 laboratory-confirmed listeriosis cases, as at 2 May 2018, has been ongoing since the start of 2017, with a 28.6% case fatality rate [13].

In Spain, food safety criteria (FSC) for L. monocytogenes follow European Commission (EC) regulations [14,15]. Before 2015, when it was added to the list of mandatory notifiable diseases, regions could voluntarily report listeriosis to the Microbiological Information System (Sistema de Información Microbiológica, SIM) [16]. Using the centralised hospital discharge database (Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos, CMBD), we aimed to describe the epidemiology of listeriosis in Spain from 1997–2015.

FULL TEXT

https://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.21.1800271

PDF (CLIC en DOWNLOAD PDF)

June 21, 2019 at 7:49 am

Antibiotics for operative vaginal delivery –  practice-changing data

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2361-2362

COMMENT

Antibiotics for operative vaginal delivery –  practice-changing data

The large randomised controlled trial on the effect of antibiotics to prevent infection after operative vaginal delivery by Marian Knight and colleagues1 in The Lancet is practice changing. Operative vaginal deliveries include either vacuum or forceps, and are used in about 2–15% of births.2 Even if one conservatively estimates 2% of babies are born by operative vaginal delivery globally, about 2 700 000 of the world’s 135 million annual births are operative vaginal deliveries. Up to 16% of these births can be associated with infection without antibiotics prophylaxis,3 representing about 432 000 annual infections associated with operative vaginal delivery worldwide……

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30845-1/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930845-1

 

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2395-2403

ARTICLES

Prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infection after operative vaginal delivery (ANODE): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

Background

Risk factors for maternal infection are clearly recognised, including caesarean section and operative vaginal birth. Antibiotic prophylaxis at caesarean section is widely recommended because there is clear systematic review evidence that it reduces incidence of maternal infection. Current WHO guidelines do not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing operative vaginal birth because of insufficient evidence of effectiveness. We aimed to investigate whether antibiotic prophylaxis prevented maternal infection after operative vaginal birth.

Methods

In a blinded, randomised controlled trial done at 27 UK obstetric units, women (aged ≥16 years) were allocated to receive a single dose of intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid or placebo (saline) following operative vaginal birth at 36 weeks gestation or later. The primary outcome was confirmed or suspected maternal infection within 6 weeks of delivery defined by a new prescription of antibiotics for specific indications, confirmed systemic infection on culture, or endometritis. We did an intention-to-treat analysis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number 11166984, and is closed to accrual.

Findings

Between March 13, 2016, and June 13, 2018, 3427 women were randomly assigned to treatment: 1719 to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, and 1708 to placebo. Seven women withdrew, leaving 1715 in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid group and 1705 in the placebo groups. Primary outcome data were missing for 195 (6%) women. Significantly fewer women allocated to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid had a confirmed or suspected infection (180 [11%] of 1619) than women allocated to placebo (306 [19%] of 1606; risk ratio 0·58, 95% CI 0·49–0·69; p<0·0001). One woman in the placebo group reported a skin rash and two women in the amoxicillin and clavulanic acid reported other allergic reactions, one of which was reported as a serious adverse event. Two other serious adverse events were reported, neither was considered causally related to the treatment.

Interpretation

This trial shows benefit of a single dose of prophylactic antibiotic after operative vaginal birth and guidance from WHO and other national organisations should be changed to reflect this.

Funding

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30773-1/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930773-1

June 14, 2019 at 3:54 pm

Reduced rate of intensive care unit acquired gram-negative bacilli after removal of sinks and introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care.

Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. June 2017 V.6 P.59.

Hopman J#1, Tostmann A#1, Wertheim H1, Bos M1, Kolwijck E1, Akkermans R2, Sturm P1,3, Voss A1,4, Pickkers P5, Vd Hoeven H5.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sinks in patient rooms are associated with hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of removal of sinks from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient rooms and the introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care on gram-negative bacilli colonization rates.

METHODS:

We conducted a 2-year pre/post quasi-experimental study that compared monthly gram-negative bacilli colonization rates pre- and post-intervention using segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series data. Five ICUs of a tertiary care medical center were included. Participants were all patients of 18 years and older admitted to our ICUs for at least 48 h who also received selective digestive tract decontamination during the twelve month pre-intervention or the twelve month post-intervention period. The effect of sink removal and the introduction of ‘water-free’ patient care on colonization rates with gram-negative bacilli was evaluated. The main outcome of this study was the monthly colonization rate with gram-negative bacilli (GNB). Yeast colonization rates were used as a ‘negative control’. In addition, colonization rates were calculated for first positive culture results from cultures taken ≥3, ≥5, ≥7, ≥10 and ≥14 days after ICU-admission, rate ratios (RR) were calculated and differences tested with chi-squared tests.

RESULTS:

In the pre-intervention period, 1496 patients (9153 admission days) and in the post-intervention period 1444 patients (9044 admission days) were included. Segmented regression analysis showed that the intervention was followed by a statistically significant immediate reduction in GNB colonization in absence of a pre or post intervention trend in GNB colonization. The overall GNB colonization rate dropped from 26.3 to 21.6 GNB/1000 ICU admission days (colonization rate ratio 0.82; 95%CI 0.67-0.99; P = 0.02). The reduction in GNB colonization rate became more pronounced in patients with a longer ICU-Length of Stay (LOS): from a 1.22-fold reduction (≥2 days), to a 1.6-fold (≥5 days; P = 0.002), 2.5-fold (for ≥10 days; P < 0.001) to a 3.6-fold (≥14 days; P < 0.001) reduction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Removal of sinks from patient rooms and introduction of a method of ‘water-free’ patient care is associated with a significant reduction of patient colonization with GNB, especially in patients with a longer ICU length of stay.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5466749/pdf/13756_2017_Article_213.pdf

June 3, 2019 at 6:20 pm

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