Posts filed under ‘Profilaxis Antibiótica en Cirugía – PAC’

Recommendations for prevention of surgical site infection in adult elective arthroplasty.

Medicina (B Aires). 2017;77(2):143-157.

[Article in Spanish]

Chuluyán JC1, Vila A2, Chattás AL3, Montero M3, Pensotti C4, Tosello C5, Sánchez M6, Vera Ocampo C7, Kremer G8, Quirós R8, Benchetrit GA9, Pérez CF10, Terusi AL11, Nacinovich F12.

Author information

1 Grupo de Trabajo Infectología, Hospital General de Agudos Dr. T. álvarez, Argentina. E-mail: jcchulu@gmail.com

2 Servicio de Infectología, Hospital Italiano de Mendoza, Mendoza, Argentina.

3 Hospital General de Agudos Dr. Pirovano, Argentina.

4 Clínica Monte Grande, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

5 Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

6 Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

7 Sanatorio Dupuytren, Argentina.

8 Hospital Universitario Austral, Argentina.

9 Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas A. Lanari, UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

10 Policlínico del Docente-Centro Médico Huésped, Argentina.

11 Instituto César Milstein, Argentina.

12 Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires, Centros Médicos Dr. Stamboulian, Argentina.

Abstract

Surgical site infections complicating orthopedic implant surgeries prolong hospital stay and increase risk of readmission, hospitalization costs and mortality. These recommendations are aimed at:

(i) optimizing compliance and incorporating habits in all surgery phases by detecting risk factors for surgical site infections which are potentially correctable or modifiable; and

(ii) optimizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis as well as intraoperative and postoperative care.

PDF

http://www.medicinabuenosaires.com/PMID/28463223.pdf

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August 31, 2017 at 3:49 pm

Impact of intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis upon the intestinal microbiota and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in vaginally delivered full-term neonates.

Microbiome. August 8, 2017 V.5 N.1 P.93.

Nogacka A1, Salazar N1, Suárez M2, Milani C3, Arboleya S1,4, Solís G2, Fernández N2, Alaez L1, Hernández-Barranco AM1, de Los Reyes-Gavilán CG1, Ventura M3, Gueimonde M5.

Author information

1 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Ctra. Infiesto s/n, 33300, Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain.

2 Pediatrics Service, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, SESPA, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.

3 Laboratory of Probiogenomics, Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

4 Current address: APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork. Cork, Ireland & Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Fermoy, Cork, Ireland.

5 Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Ctra. Infiesto s/n, 33300, Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain. mgueimonde@ipla.csic.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Disturbances in the early establishment of the intestinal microbiota may produce important implications for the infant’s health and for the risk of disease later on. Different perinatal conditions may be affecting the development of the gut microbiota. Some of them, such as delivery mode or feeding habits, have been extensively assessed whereas others remain to be studied, being critical to identify their impact on the microbiota and, if any, to minimize it. Antibiotics are among the drugs most frequently used in early life, the use of intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis (IAP), present in over 30% of deliveries, being the most frequent source of exposure. However, our knowledge on the effects of IAP on the microbiota establishment is still limited. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the impact of IAP investigating a cohort of 40 full-term vaginally delivered infants born after an uncomplicated pregnancy, 18 of which were born from mothers receiving IAP.

RESULTS:

Fecal samples were collected at 2, 10, 30, and 90 days of age. We analyzed the composition of the fecal microbiota during the first 3 months of life by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantified fecal short chain fatty acids by gas chromatography. The presence of genes for resistance to antibiotics was determined by PCR in the samples from 1-month-old infants. Our results showed an altered pattern of intestinal microbiota establishment in IAP infants during the first weeks of life, with lower relative proportions of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes and increased of Preoteobacteria and Firmicutes. A delay in the increase on the levels of acetate was observed in IAP infants. The analyses of specific antibiotic resistance genes showed a higher occurrence of some β-lactamase coding genes in infants whose mothers received IAP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate an effect of IAP on the establishing early microbiota during the first months of life, which represent a key moment for the development of the microbiota-induced host homeostasis. Understanding the impact of IAP in the gut microbiota development is essential for developing treatments to minimize it, favoring a proper gut microbiota development in IAP-exposed neonates.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549288/pdf/40168_2017_Article_313.pdf

August 22, 2017 at 3:43 pm

Risk of surgical site infection, acute kidney injury, and Clostridium difficile infection following antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin plus a beta-lactam versus either drug alone: A national propensity-score-adjusted retrospective cohort study.

PLoS Med. 2017 Jul 10;14(7):e1002340.

Branch-Elliman W1,2,3, Ripollone JE4, O’Brien WJ3, Itani KMF2,5,6, Schweizer ML7,8, Perencevich E7,8, Strymish J1,2, Gupta K1,3,5.

Author information

1 Department of Medicine, VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts, United States of America.

2 Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

3 VA Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts, United States of America.

4 Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

5 Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

6 Department of Surgery, VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts, United States of America.

7 VA Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research & Evaluation, Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa, United States of America.

8 Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The optimal regimen for perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is controversial. Use of combination prophylaxis with a beta-lactam plus vancomycin is increasing; however, the relative risks and benefits associated with this strategy are unknown. Thus, we sought to compare postoperative outcomes following administration of 2 antimicrobials versus a single agent for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Potential harms associated with combination regimens, including acute kidney injury (AKI) and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), were also considered.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

Using a multicenter, national Veterans Affairs (VA) cohort, all patients who underwent cardiac, orthopedic joint replacement, vascular, colorectal, and hysterectomy procedures during the period from 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2013 and who received planned manual review of perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen and manual review for the 30-day incidence of SSI were included. Using a propensity-adjusted log-binomial regression model stratified by type of surgical procedure, the association between receipt of 2 antimicrobials (vancomycin plus a beta-lactam) versus either single agent alone (vancomycin or a beta-lactam) and SSI was evaluated. Measures of association were adjusted for age, diabetes, smoking, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status, and receipt of mupirocin. The 7-day incidence of postoperative AKI and 90-day incidence of CDI were also measured. In all, 70,101 procedures (52,504 beta-lactam only, 5,089 vancomycin only, and 12,508 combination) with 2,466 (3.5%) SSIs from 109 medical centers were included. Among cardiac surgery patients, combination prophylaxis was associated with a lower incidence of SSI (66/6,953, 0.95%) than single-agent prophylaxis (190/12,834, 1.48%; crude risk ratio [RR] 0.64, 95% CI 0.49, 0.85; adjusted RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.46, 0.83). After adjusting for SSI risk, no association between receipt of combination prophylaxis and SSI was found for the other types of surgeries evaluated, including orthopedic joint replacement procedures. In MRSA-colonized patients undergoing cardiac surgery, SSI occurred in 8/346 (2.3%) patients who received combination prophylaxis versus 4/100 (4.0%) patients who received vancomycin alone (crude RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.18, 1.88). Among MRSA-negative and -unknown cardiac surgery patients, SSIs occurred in 58/6,607 (0.9%) patients receiving combination prophylaxis versus 146/10,215 (1.4%) patients who received a beta-lactam alone (crude RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.45, 0.83). Based on these associations, the number needed to treat to prevent 1 SSI in MRSA-colonized patients is estimated to be 53, compared to 176 in non-MRSA patients. CDI incidence was similar in both exposure groups. Across all types of surgical procedures, risk of AKI was increased in the combination antimicrobial prophylaxis group (2,971/12,508 [23.8%] receiving combination versus 1,058/5,089 [20.8%] receiving vancomycin alone versus 7,314/52,504 [13.9%] receiving beta-lactam alone). We found a significant association between absolute risk of AKI and receipt of combination regimens across all types of procedures. If the observed association is causal, the number needed to harm for severe AKI following cardiac surgery would be 167. The major limitation of our investigation is that it is an observational study in a predominantly male population, which may limit generalizability and lead to unmeasured confounding.

CONCLUSIONS:

There are benefits but also unintended consequences of antimicrobial and infection prevention strategies aimed at “getting to zero” healthcare-associated infections. In our study, combination prophylaxis was associated with both benefits (reduction in SSIs following cardiac surgical procedures) and harms (increase in postoperative AKI). In cardiac surgery patients, the difference in risk-benefit profile by MRSA status suggests that MRSA-screening-directed prophylaxis may optimize benefits while minimizing harms in this selected population. More information about long-term outcomes and patient and societal preferences regarding risk of SSI versus risk of AKI is needed to improve clinical decision-making.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5503171/pdf/pmed.1002340.pdf

August 10, 2017 at 8:40 am

Editorial – Vancomycin Prophylaxis for Total Joint Arthroplasty: Incorrectly Dosed and Has a Higher Rate of Periprosthetic Infection Than Cefazolin

Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research July 2017 V.475 N.7 P.1762-1766

 

Daniel Wongworawat MD

PDF

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11999-017-5354-1.pdf

July 30, 2017 at 3:00 pm

Efficacy of indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression for prosthetic joint infection in the elderly: a comparative study

International Journal of Infectious Diseases July 2017 V.60 N.7 P.57-60

 

  1. Prendki, P. Sergent, A. Barrelet, E. Oziol, E. Beretti, M. Berlioz-Thibal, F. Bouchand, F.A. Dauchy, E. Forestier, G. Gavazzi, C. Ronde-Oustau, J. Stirnemann, A. Dinh

Highlights

  • Antimicrobial suppression appears to be effective for prosthetic joint infection (PJI).
  • Antimicrobial suppression appears safe for PJI.
  • Antimicrobial suppression is an adequate option for elderly patients with PJI.

Background

During prosthetic joint infection (PJI), surgical management is sometimes impossible and indefinite chronic oral antimicrobial suppression (ICOAS) may be the only option. The outcomes of elderly patients who benefited from ICOAS with strictly palliative intent were evaluated.

Methods

A national retrospective cohort study was performed in France, involving patients aged >75 years with a PJI who were managed with planned life-long ICOAS from 2009 to 2014. Patients who experienced an event were compared to those who did not. An event was defined as a composite outcome in patients undergoing ICOAS, including local or systemic progression of the infection, death, or discontinuation of antimicrobial therapy because of an adverse drug reaction.

Results

Twenty-one patients were included, with a median age of 85 years (interquartile range 81–88 years). Eight of the 21 patients experienced an event: one had an adverse drug reaction, three had systemic progression of sepsis, and two had local progression. Two of the 21 patients died. No death was related to ICOAS or infection. There was no significant difference between the population with an event and the population free of an event with regard to demographic, clinical, and microbiological characteristics (p > 0.05).

Conclusions

ICOAS appeared to be an effective and safe option in this cohort.

PDF

http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30144-3/pdf

 

July 30, 2017 at 12:54 pm

Timing of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in 54,552 patients and the risk of surgical site infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Medicine July 2017 V.96 N.29 P.e6903

de Jonge, Stijn Willem MDa; Gans, Sarah L. MD, PhDa; Atema, Jasper J. MD, PhDa; Solomkin, Joseph S. MDb; Dellinger, Patchen E. MDc; Boermeester, Marja A. MD, PhDa,*

Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess the effect of timing of preoperative surgical antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) on surgical site infection (SSI) and compare the different timing intervals.

The benefit of routine use of SAP prior to surgery has long been recognized. However, the optimal timing has not been defined. For the purpose of developing recommendations for the World Health Organization guideline for SSI prevention, a systematic review and meta-analysis of all relevant evidence was conducted.

Major medical databases were searched from 1990 to 2016. The primary outcome was SSI after preoperative-SAP comparing different timing intervals. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled for each comparison with a random effects model.

Fourteen papers with 54,552 patients were included in this review. In a quantitative analysis, there was no significant difference when SAP was administered 120–60 minutes prior to incision compared to administration 60–0 minutes prior to incision. Studies investigating different timing intervals within the last 60 minutes time frame reported contradictive results. The risk of SSI almost doubled when SAP was administered after first incision (OR:1.89; 95%CI:[1.05–3.40]) and was 5 times higher when administered more than 120 minutes prior to incision (OR5.26; 95%CI:[3.29–8.39]).

Administration of antibiotic prophylaxis more than 120 minutes before incision or after incision is associated a higher risk of surgical site infections than administration less than 120 minutes before incision. Within this 120-minute time frame prior to incision, no differential effects could be identified. The broadly accepted recommendation to administer prophylaxis within a 60-minute time frame prior to incision could not be substantiated.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/md-journal/Fulltext/2017/07210/Timing_of_preoperative_antibiotic_prophylaxis_in.1.aspx

PDF CLIC en “Article as PDF” (download)

July 22, 2017 at 10:01 am

Profilaxis antibiótica en el paciente poli-traumatizado. Guías 2011 elaboradas por los Comités de Infectología Crítica y de Trauma de la Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva (SATI)

MEDICINA INTENSIVA – 2011 – 28 Nº 4

Rosa Reina,* Guillermo Ramos,** Carina Balasini,* Héctor Canales,** Wanda Cornistein,* Alberto Cremona,* Eleonora Cunto,* Mercedes Esteban,* Alberto Legarto,** Romina Lendaro,** Candela Llerena,* Monserrat Lloria,* Mónica Quinteros,** Juan Videla* * Comité de Infectología Crítica ** Comité de Trauma Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva Buenos Aires, Argentina

Resumen

Objetivo.

Elaborar guías de profilaxis antibiótica (P-ATB) para pacientes politraumatizados.

Método.

Sistema GRADE para calidad y fuerza de la evidencia.

Resultados.

1) P-ATB prequirúrgica, desbridamiento amplio: 1-A.

2) Trauma de abdomen sin lesión de víscera hueca, con o sin packing: 2-D; con lesión de víscera hueca, con o sin packing, P-ATB hasta 24 h del posoperatorio: 1-A.

3) Trauma de cráneo: a) colocación de sensor de presión intracraneal: 2-D; b) fractura de base de cráneo: no administrar P-ATB: 1-A; c) fractura con hundimiento, por arma de fuego, con atricción de partes blandas o sin ella (la P-ATB no previene meningitis o absceso): 2-D.

4) Trauma maxilofacial: a) cerrado: con hemoseno o sin él, no administrar P-ATB: 1-A; b) penetrante (ruptura de senos, pérdida de piezas dentarias, con laceración de mucosa o sin ella): P-ATB por un día: 1-A; c) fractura mandibular: reducción cerrada/abierta: P-ATB posoperatoria: 2-D; d) cara sin fractura, lesión de partes blandas: 2-D; e) trauma ocular penetrante: PATB durante un día: 2-D.

5) Quemados: a) prevenir sepsis temprana e infección de herida: 1-C; b) quemados graves, de alto riesgo, en asistencia respiratoria mecánica: prevención de neumonía e infecciones intrahospitalarias: 2-B; c) quemadura <40%: curación simple, balneoterapia y resecciones de escaras: 1-C; d) procedimientos en quemaduras >40%, P-ATB perioperatoria para reducir la bacteriemia y la infección de la quemadura: 2-C; e) prevenir la pérdida de injertos de piel autóloga: 2-C.

6) Trauma de tórax: a) colocación de drenaje: 2-D; b) aspiración de contenido gástrico: no administrar P-ATB: 1-A.

7) Trauma pelviano-genitourinario abierto a vagina/recto y lesión de víscera hueca: P-ATB hasta 24 h del posoperatorio: 1-A.

8) Fractura expuesta de huesos largos: a) iniciar P-ATB rápidamente: 1-A; b) Gustillo I-II: suspender antibiótico a las 24 h del cierre de las heridas: 1-B; c) Gustillo III: continuar antibiótico por 72 h luego del trauma y 24 h después del cierre de las heridas: 1-B.

Conclusión.

Pocas indicaciones con fuerte nivel de evidencia para P-ATB

PDF

http://revista.sati.org.ar/index.php/MI/article/viewFile/285/239

July 17, 2017 at 8:03 am

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