Posts filed under ‘Profilaxis Pre-Exposición’

BHIVA-BASHH Guidelines on the use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) 2018. 79 pag.

HIV Med. Marcj 2019 V.20  Suppl 2  P. s2-s80

FULL TEXT

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/hiv.12718

PDF

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hiv.12718

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March 28, 2019 at 3:34 pm

2017-10 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS). European guidelines for clinical management and treatment of HIV-1-infected adults in Europe 102 pag

Welcome to the EACS Guidelines!

These Guidelines were developed by the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS), a not-for-profit organisation, whose mission is to promote excellence in standards of care, research and education in HIV infection and related co-infections, and to actively engage in the formulation of public health policy, with the aim of reducing HIV disease burden across Europe.

The EACS Guidelines were first published in 2005, and are currently available in print, online, and as a free App for both iOS and Android devices. The Guidelines are translated to a number of different languages, and are formally revised at least annually for the electronic version and biennially for the printed version. The electronic version can, however, be updated at any given moment if the panels consider it necessary.

The aim of the EACS Guidelines is to provide easily accessible and comprehensive recommendations to clinicians centrally involved in the care of HIV-positive persons.

The EACS Guidelines are covering a relatively large and diverse area geographically, with different national levels of access to care. As a natural consequence, the Guidelines aim to cover a relatively wide range of recommendations as opposed to the often more uniform national guidelines.

The Guidelines consist of five main sections, including a general overview table of all major issues in HIV infection, as well as detailed recommendations on antiretroviral treatment, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of co-morbidities, co-infections and opportunistic diseases.

Each respective section of the Guidelines is managed by a panel of experienced European HIV experts, and additional experts, where needed. All recommendations are evidence-based whenever possible, and based on expert opinions in the rare instances where adequate evidence is unavailable. It was decided not to provide formal grades of evidence in the Guidelines. The panels make decisions by consensus or by vote when necessary. Yet, it was decided not to publish results of the votes or discrepancies if any.

A list of the main references used to produce the Guidelines is provided as a separate section. Please reference the EACS Guidelines as follows: EACS Guidelines version 9.0, October 2017. Video links to the EACS online course on Clinical Management of HIV are provided throughout the Guidelines, see Video links.

The diagnosis and management of HIV infection and related co-infections, opportunistic diseases and co-morbidities continue to require a multidisciplinary effort for which we hope the 2017 version of the EACS Guidelines will provide you with an easily accessible and updated overview.

All comments to the Guidelines are welcome and can be directed to guidelines@eacsociety.org

We wish to warmly thank all panellists, external experts, linguists, translators, the EACS Secretariat, the Sanford team and everyone else who helped to build up and to publish the EACS Guidelines for their dedicated work.

 

Enjoy!

Manuel Battegay and Lene Ryom – October 2017

PDF

http://www.eacsociety.org/files/guidelines_9.0-english.pdf

March 19, 2019 at 4:00 pm

Human Rabies — Virginia, 2017

MMWR January 4, 2019  V.67 N.5152 P.1410–1414

Julia Murphy, DVM1; Costi D. Sifri, MD2; Rhonda Pruitt3; Marcia Hornberger4; Denise Bonds4; Jesse Blanton, DrPH5; James Ellison, PhD5; R. Elaine Cagnina2; Kyle B. Enfield2; Miriam Shiferaw, MD5; Crystal Gigante, PhD5; Edgar Condori5; Karen Gruszynski, PhD1,6; Ryan M. Wallace, DVM5

On May 9, 2017, the Virginia Department of Health was notified regarding a patient with suspected rabies. The patient had sustained a dog bite 6 weeks before symptom onset while traveling in India.

On May 11, CDC confirmed that the patient was infected with a rabies virus that circulates in dogs in India.

Despite aggressive treatment, the patient died, becoming the ninth person exposed to rabies abroad who has died from rabies in the United States since 2008.

A total of 250 health care workers were assessed for exposure to the patient, 72 (29%) of whom were advised to initiate postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). The total pharmaceutical cost for PEP (rabies immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine) was approximately $235,000.

International travelers should consider a pretravel consultation with travel health specialists; rabies preexposure prophylaxis is warranted for travelers who will be in rabies endemic countries for long durations, in remote areas, or who plan activities that might put them at risk for a rabies exposures.

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm675152a2-H.pdf

More information for international travelers about rabies considerations can be found on the CDC’s rabies webpage.

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html

January 26, 2019 at 12:41 pm

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2018;67(43):1216-1220.

Update

Noele P. Nelson, MD, PhD1; Ruth Link-Gelles, PhD1; Megan G. Hofmeister, MD1; José R. Romero, MD2; Kelly L. Moore, MD3; John W. Ward, MD1; Sarah F. Schillie, MD1

Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine or immune globulin (IG) effectively prevents infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) when administered within 2 weeks of exposure. Preexposure prophylaxis against HAV infection through the administration of HepA vaccine or IG provides protection for unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries that have high or intermediate HAV endemicity. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Hepatitis Vaccines Work Group conducted a systematic review of the evidence for administering vaccine for PEP to persons aged >40 years and reviewed the HepA vaccine efficacy and safety in infants and the benefits of protection against HAV before international travel….

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm6743a5-H.pdf

December 10, 2018 at 3:44 pm

Being PrEPared  – Preexposure Prophylaxis and HIV Disparities.

N Engl J of Med October 4, 2018 V.379 P.1293-1295

Perspective

Robert H. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D., Carl G. Streed, Jr., M.D., and Sean R. Cahill, Ph.D.

If current trends persist, one in six U.S. men who have sex with men will be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1 This prediction highlights the long road ahead if we are to end the spread of HIV in the United States, but it does not tell the full story, which is complicated and nuanced….

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1804306?query=infectious-disease

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1804306

November 6, 2018 at 8:21 am

Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Health Intervention to Promote Retention and Adherence to Pre-exposure Prophylaxis among Young People at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus: The EPIC Study.

Clinical Infectious Diseases September 15, 2018.             

Liu AY1,2, Vittinghoff E3, von Felten P1, Amico KR4, Anderson PL5, Lester R6, Andrew E1, Estes I7,8, Serrano P7,8, Brothers J7,8, Buchbinder S1,2,3, Hosek S7,8, Fuchs JD2,9.

Author information

1 Bridge HIV, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA.

2 Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

4 Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

5 Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO USA.

6 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

7 Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

8 Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, IL.

9 Center for Learning & Innovation, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Young men who have sex with men (MSM) are among the most vulnerable to HIV infection in the United States. While pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has demonstrated effectiveness, adherence and retention in care have been low among youth.

METHODS:

We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a youth-tailored, bi-directional text-messaging PrEP support intervention (PrEPmate) on study retention and PrEP adherence. Young individuals at risk for HIV acquisition initiating PrEP within Chicago’s safety-net hospital system were randomized 2:1 to receive PrEPmate or standard of care (SoC) for 36 weeks. The primary retention outcome was study-visit completion, and the primary adherence outcome was tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) concentrations ≥700 fmol/punch (consistent with ≥4 doses/week) assessed at 4, 12, 24, and 36 weeks. The impact of PrEPmate on retention and adherence was evaluated using generalized estimating equation logistic models with robust standard errors.

RESULTS:

From April 2015 to March 2016, 121 participants enrolled (mean age 24; 27% Black, 36% Latino). Across all visits, participants who received PrEPmate were more likely to attend study visits (86% PrEPmate vs. 71% SoC, OR=2.62, 95%CI 1.24-5.54) and have TFV-DP levels consistent with ≥4 doses/week (72% PrEPmate vs. 57% SoC, OR=2.05, 95%CI 1.06-3.94). PrEPmate efficacy did not differ significantly by age, race/ethnicity, education, or insurance. Overall, 88% reported PrEPmate to be very/somewhat helpful, and 92% would recommend PrEPmate to others.

CONCLUSIONS:

An interactive text-messaging intervention had high acceptability and significantly increased study-visit retention and PrEP adherence among young individuals at risk for HIV acquisition.

FULL TEXT

https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciy810/5098440

PDF (CLIC en PDF

October 9, 2018 at 7:52 am

Correspondence: Multidrug-resistant HIV-1 infection despite preexposure prophylaxis.

N Engl J Med 2017 Feb 2; 376:501

Knox DC et al.

To the Editor:

Preexposure prophylaxis with emtricitabine (FTC)–tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been shown to be efficacious in preventing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in men who have sex with men and in whom adherence to treatment is high, as measured by levels of tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in dried blood spots.1 We describe a case of HIV-1 infection despite FTC-TDF–based preexposure prophylaxis.2

A 43-year-old man in Toronto who reported having sex with men began to receive oral daily FTC-TDF in April 2013 and had seven nonreactive fourth-generation HIV screening tests over the next 21 months. Pharmacy dispensation records provided support for his report of “perfect” adherence to preexposure prophylaxis over 24 months……

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMc1611639

March 14, 2017 at 7:35 am

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