Posts filed under ‘Profilaxis Pre-Exposición’

Meningococcal Disease Among College-Aged Young Adults: 2014–2016

Pediatrics January 2019  V.143  N.1

BACKGROUND:

Freshman college students living in residence halls have previously been identified as being at an increased risk for meningococcal disease. In this evaluation, we assess the incidence and characteristics of meningococcal disease in college-aged young adults in the United States.

METHODS:

The incidence and relative risk (RR) of meningococcal disease among college students compared with noncollege students aged 18 to 24 years during 2014–2016 were calculated by using data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance. Differences in demographic characteristics and clinical features of meningococcal disease cases were assessed. Available meningococcal isolates were characterized by using slide agglutination, polymerase chain reaction, and whole genome sequencing.

RESULTS:

From 2014 to 2016, 166 cases of meningococcal disease occurred in persons aged 18 to 24 years, with an average annual incidence of 0.17 cases per 100 000 population. Six serogroup B outbreaks were identified on college campuses, accounting for 30% of serogroup B cases in college students during this period. The RR of serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) disease in college students versus noncollege students was 3.54 (95% confidence interval: 2.21–5.41), and the RR of serogroups C, W, and Y combined was 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.27–1.14). The most common serogroup B clonal complexes identified were CC32/ET-5 and CC41/44 lineage 3.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the incidence is low, among 18- to 24-year-olds, college students are at an increased risk for sporadic and outbreak-associated MenB disease. Providers, college students, and parents should be aware of the availability of MenB vaccines.

FULL TEXT

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/143/1/e20182130

PDF

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/143/1/e20182130.full.pdf

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June 17, 2019 at 6:59 pm

Successful treatment of HIV eliminates sexual transmission

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2366-2367

COMMENT

Successful treatment of HIV eliminates sexual transmission

In December, 2011, Science recognised the findings of the HPTN 052 study1 as the scientific breakthrough of the year.2 This study showed a 96% reduction in sexual transmission of HIV in serodifferent couples (one partner HIV positive, the other HIV negative) when the HIV-positive partner was successfully treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART).1

However, the HPTN 052 study included only a small number of men who have sex with men (MSM), for whom HIV acquisition often includes anal exposure, an efficient route of HIV transmission.3

Furthermore, the couples in the HPTN 052 study were counselled to use condoms, so the observed benefits of ART also reflected the contribution of safer sexual behaviours.

Accordingly, other investigators4,  5 have subsequently studied HIV transmission in couples who specifically chose not to use condoms…..

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30701-9/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930701-9

 

LANCET June 15, 2019 V.393 N.10189 P.2428-2438

ARTICLES

Risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex in serodifferent gay couples with the HIV-positive partner taking suppressive antiretroviral therapy (PARTNER): final results of a multicentre, prospective, observational study

Background

The level of evidence for HIV transmission risk through condomless sex in serodifferent gay couples with the HIV-positive partner taking virally suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited compared with the evidence available for transmission risk in heterosexual couples. The aim of the second phase of the PARTNER study (PARTNER2) was to provide precise estimates of transmission risk in gay serodifferent partnerships.

Methods

The PARTNER study was a prospective observational study done at 75 sites in 14 European countries. The first phase of the study (PARTNER1; Sept 15, 2010, to May 31, 2014) recruited and followed up both heterosexual and gay serodifferent couples (HIV-positive partner taking suppressive ART) who reported condomless sex, whereas the PARTNER2 extension (to April 30, 2018) recruited and followed up gay couples only. At study visits, data collection included sexual behaviour questionnaires, HIV testing (HIV-negative partner), and HIV-1 viral load testing (HIV-positive partner). If a seroconversion occurred in the HIV-negative partner, anonymised phylogenetic analysis was done to compare HIV-1 pol and env sequences in both partners to identify linked transmissions. Couple-years of follow-up were eligible for inclusion if condomless sex was reported, use of pre-exposure prophylaxis or post-exposure prophylaxis was not reported by the HIV-negative partner, and the HIV-positive partner was virally suppressed (plasma HIV-1 RNA <200 copies per mL) at the most recent visit (within the past year). Incidence rate of HIV transmission was calculated as the number of phylogenetically linked HIV infections that occurred during eligible couple-years of follow-up divided by eligible couple-years of follow-up. Two-sided 95% CIs for the incidence rate of transmission were calculated using exact Poisson methods.

Findings

Between Sept 15, 2010, and July 31, 2017, 972 gay couples were enrolled, of which 782 provided 1593 eligible couple-years of follow-up with a median follow-up of 2·0 years (IQR 1·1–3·5). At baseline, median age for HIV-positive partners was 40 years (IQR 33–46) and couples reported condomless sex for a median of 1·0 years (IQR 0·4–2·9). During eligible couple-years of follow-up, couples reported condomless anal sex a total of 76 088 times. 288 (37%) of 777 HIV-negative men reported condomless sex with other partners. 15 new HIV infections occurred during eligible couple-years of follow-up, but none were phylogenetically linked within-couple transmissions, resulting in an HIV transmission rate of zero (upper 95% CI 0·23 per 100 couple-years of follow-up).

Interpretation

Our results provide a similar level of evidence on viral suppression and HIV transmission risk for gay men to that previously generated for heterosexual couples and suggest that the risk of HIV transmission in gay couples through condomless sex when HIV viral load is suppressed is effectively zero. Our findings support the message of the U=U (undetectable equals untransmittable) campaign, and the benefits of early testing and treatment for HIV.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research.

FULL TEXT

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30418-0/fulltext?dgcid=raven_jbs_etoc_email

PDF

https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2819%2930418-0

June 14, 2019 at 3:57 pm

BHIVA-BASHH Guidelines on the use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) 2018. 79 pag.

HIV Med. Marcj 2019 V.20  Suppl 2  P. s2-s80

FULL TEXT

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/hiv.12718

PDF

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hiv.12718

March 28, 2019 at 3:34 pm

2017-10 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS). European guidelines for clinical management and treatment of HIV-1-infected adults in Europe 102 pag

Welcome to the EACS Guidelines!

These Guidelines were developed by the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS), a not-for-profit organisation, whose mission is to promote excellence in standards of care, research and education in HIV infection and related co-infections, and to actively engage in the formulation of public health policy, with the aim of reducing HIV disease burden across Europe.

The EACS Guidelines were first published in 2005, and are currently available in print, online, and as a free App for both iOS and Android devices. The Guidelines are translated to a number of different languages, and are formally revised at least annually for the electronic version and biennially for the printed version. The electronic version can, however, be updated at any given moment if the panels consider it necessary.

The aim of the EACS Guidelines is to provide easily accessible and comprehensive recommendations to clinicians centrally involved in the care of HIV-positive persons.

The EACS Guidelines are covering a relatively large and diverse area geographically, with different national levels of access to care. As a natural consequence, the Guidelines aim to cover a relatively wide range of recommendations as opposed to the often more uniform national guidelines.

The Guidelines consist of five main sections, including a general overview table of all major issues in HIV infection, as well as detailed recommendations on antiretroviral treatment, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of co-morbidities, co-infections and opportunistic diseases.

Each respective section of the Guidelines is managed by a panel of experienced European HIV experts, and additional experts, where needed. All recommendations are evidence-based whenever possible, and based on expert opinions in the rare instances where adequate evidence is unavailable. It was decided not to provide formal grades of evidence in the Guidelines. The panels make decisions by consensus or by vote when necessary. Yet, it was decided not to publish results of the votes or discrepancies if any.

A list of the main references used to produce the Guidelines is provided as a separate section. Please reference the EACS Guidelines as follows: EACS Guidelines version 9.0, October 2017. Video links to the EACS online course on Clinical Management of HIV are provided throughout the Guidelines, see Video links.

The diagnosis and management of HIV infection and related co-infections, opportunistic diseases and co-morbidities continue to require a multidisciplinary effort for which we hope the 2017 version of the EACS Guidelines will provide you with an easily accessible and updated overview.

All comments to the Guidelines are welcome and can be directed to guidelines@eacsociety.org

We wish to warmly thank all panellists, external experts, linguists, translators, the EACS Secretariat, the Sanford team and everyone else who helped to build up and to publish the EACS Guidelines for their dedicated work.

 

Enjoy!

Manuel Battegay and Lene Ryom – October 2017

PDF

http://www.eacsociety.org/files/guidelines_9.0-english.pdf

March 19, 2019 at 4:00 pm

Human Rabies — Virginia, 2017

MMWR January 4, 2019  V.67 N.5152 P.1410–1414

Julia Murphy, DVM1; Costi D. Sifri, MD2; Rhonda Pruitt3; Marcia Hornberger4; Denise Bonds4; Jesse Blanton, DrPH5; James Ellison, PhD5; R. Elaine Cagnina2; Kyle B. Enfield2; Miriam Shiferaw, MD5; Crystal Gigante, PhD5; Edgar Condori5; Karen Gruszynski, PhD1,6; Ryan M. Wallace, DVM5

On May 9, 2017, the Virginia Department of Health was notified regarding a patient with suspected rabies. The patient had sustained a dog bite 6 weeks before symptom onset while traveling in India.

On May 11, CDC confirmed that the patient was infected with a rabies virus that circulates in dogs in India.

Despite aggressive treatment, the patient died, becoming the ninth person exposed to rabies abroad who has died from rabies in the United States since 2008.

A total of 250 health care workers were assessed for exposure to the patient, 72 (29%) of whom were advised to initiate postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). The total pharmaceutical cost for PEP (rabies immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine) was approximately $235,000.

International travelers should consider a pretravel consultation with travel health specialists; rabies preexposure prophylaxis is warranted for travelers who will be in rabies endemic countries for long durations, in remote areas, or who plan activities that might put them at risk for a rabies exposures.

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm675152a2-H.pdf

More information for international travelers about rabies considerations can be found on the CDC’s rabies webpage.

FULL TEXT

https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html

January 26, 2019 at 12:41 pm

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of Hepatitis A Vaccine for Postexposure Prophylaxis and for Preexposure Prophylaxis for International Travel

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2018;67(43):1216-1220.

Update

Noele P. Nelson, MD, PhD1; Ruth Link-Gelles, PhD1; Megan G. Hofmeister, MD1; José R. Romero, MD2; Kelly L. Moore, MD3; John W. Ward, MD1; Sarah F. Schillie, MD1

Postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine or immune globulin (IG) effectively prevents infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) when administered within 2 weeks of exposure. Preexposure prophylaxis against HAV infection through the administration of HepA vaccine or IG provides protection for unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries that have high or intermediate HAV endemicity. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Hepatitis Vaccines Work Group conducted a systematic review of the evidence for administering vaccine for PEP to persons aged >40 years and reviewed the HepA vaccine efficacy and safety in infants and the benefits of protection against HAV before international travel….

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/pdfs/mm6743a5-H.pdf

December 10, 2018 at 3:44 pm

Being PrEPared  – Preexposure Prophylaxis and HIV Disparities.

N Engl J of Med October 4, 2018 V.379 P.1293-1295

Perspective

Robert H. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D., Carl G. Streed, Jr., M.D., and Sean R. Cahill, Ph.D.

If current trends persist, one in six U.S. men who have sex with men will be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1 This prediction highlights the long road ahead if we are to end the spread of HIV in the United States, but it does not tell the full story, which is complicated and nuanced….

FULL TEXT

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1804306?query=infectious-disease

PDF

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp1804306

November 6, 2018 at 8:21 am

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