Posts filed under ‘REPORTS’

Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection associated with hemophagocytic syndrome and extra-nodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in an 18-year-old girl: A case report

MEDICINE May 2015 V.96 N.19 P.e6845

Xing, Yawei; Yang, Junwen; Lian, Guanghui; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Li, Fujun

Rationale:

Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection (CAEBV) associated with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and extra-nodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL) is a rare life-threatening disorder. This disease is easily misdiagnosed because of its varied presentations.

Patient concerns:

An 18-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with a history of edema in the lower limbs and intermittent fever lasting for more than 1 month. At admission, she had severe liver injury of unknown etiology. Laboratory test results revealed pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Results of serologic tests for EBV were positive. Results of a skin biopsy indicated EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and bone marrow aspiration revealed focal hemophagocytosis and atypical lymphoid cells.

Diagnosis:

On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the case as extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma-associated HPS (natural killer/T-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome), which is commonly induced by CAEBV.

Interventions:

Treatment consisted of general management of hepatitis, supplemented with albumin and empirical antibiotic therapy.

Outcomes:

The patient died from massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage a week after she was discharged from the hospital.

Lessons:

ENKL and HPS present with varied features and are generally fatal; therefore, clinicians should proceed with caution in suspected cases. HPS should be considered when the patient presents with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and liver failure. When HPS is suspected, clinicians should determine the underlying cause, such as severe infection, including infection with viruses such as EBV; genetic predisposition; or underlying malignancies, especially lymphoma because of its strong association with HPS.

FULL TEXT

http://journals.lww.com/md-journal/Fulltext/2017/05120/Chronic_active_Epstein_Barr_virus_infection.38.aspx

PDF (download haciendo CLIC en “Article as PDF”)

 

May 12, 2017 at 3:35 pm

Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections.

Clin Microbiol Rev. April 2016 V.29 N.2 P.201-22.

Septimus EJ1, Schweizer ML2.

Author information

1 Hospital Corporation of America, Nashville, Tennessee, USA Texas A&M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA Edward.septimus@hcahealthcare.com.

2 University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, Iowa, USA University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Abstract

Colonization with health care-associated pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Gram-negative organisms, and Clostridium difficile is associated with increased risk of infection.

Decolonization is an evidence-based intervention that can be used to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs).

This review evaluates agents used for nasal topical decolonization, topical (e.g., skin) decolonization, oral decolonization, and selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination. Although the majority of studies performed to date have focused on S. aureus decolonization, there is increasing interest in how to apply decolonization strategies to reduce infections due to Gram-negative organisms, especially those that are multidrug resistant.

Nasal topical decolonization agents reviewed include mupirocin, bacitracin, retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, photodynamic therapy, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin.

Mupirocin is still the gold standard agent for S. aureus nasal decolonization, but there is concern about mupirocin resistance, and alternative agents are needed. Of the other nasal decolonization agents, large clinical trials are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin.

Given inferior outcomes and increased risk of allergic dermatitis, the use of bacitracin-containing compounds cannot be recommended as a decolonization strategy.

Topical decolonization agents reviewed included chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), hexachlorophane, povidone-iodine, triclosan, and sodium hypochlorite. Of these, CHG is the skin decolonization agent that has the strongest evidence base, and sodium hypochlorite can also be recommended. CHG is associated with prevention of infections due to Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms as well as Candida.

Conversely, triclosan use is discouraged, and topical decolonization with hexachlorophane and povidone-iodine cannot be recommended at this time.

There is also evidence to support use of selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination, but additional studies are needed to assess resistance to these agents, especially selection for resistance among Gram-negative organisms.

The strongest evidence for decolonization is for use among surgical patients as a strategy to prevent surgical site infections.

PDF

http://cmr.asm.org/content/29/2/201.full.pdf+html

May 12, 2017 at 7:45 am

Quantification of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen peptides allows rapid diagnosis of active disease and treatment monitoring.

Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. Apr 11, 2017 V.114 N.15 P.3969-3974.

Liu C1,2,3, Zhao Z4, Fan J1,3, Lyon CJ1,3, Wu HJ1,5, Nedelkov D6, Zelazny AM4, Olivier KN7, Cazares LH8, Holland SM9, Graviss EA10, Hu Y11,2,3.

Author information

1 Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030.

2 School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

3 Virginia G. Piper Biodesign Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

4 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.

5 Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

6 Molecular Biomarkers Laboratory, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287.

7 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892.

8 Molecular and Translational Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702.

9 Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892.

10 Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030.

11 Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030; tyhu@asu.edu.

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat, resulting in an urgent unmet need for a rapid, non-sputum-based quantitative test to detect active Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections in clinically diverse populations and quickly assess Mtb treatment responses for emerging drug-resistant strains. We have identified Mtb-specific peptide fragments and developed a method to rapidly quantify their serum concentrations, using antibody-labeled and energy-focusing porous discoidal silicon nanoparticles (nanodisks) and high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) to enhance sensitivity and specificity. NanoDisk-MS diagnosed active Mtb cases with high sensitivity and specificity in a case-control study with cohorts reflecting the complexity of clinical practice. Similar robust sensitivities were obtained for cases of culture-positive pulmonary TB (PTB; 91.3%) and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB; 92.3%), and the sensitivities obtained for culture-negative PTB (82.4%) and EPTB (75.0%) in HIV-positive patients significantly outperformed those reported for other available assays. NanoDisk-MS also exhibited high specificity (87.1-100%) in both healthy and high-risk groups. Absolute quantification of serum Mtb antigen concentration was informative in assessing responses to antimycobacterial treatment. Thus, a NanoDisk-MS assay approach could significantly improve the diagnosis and management of active TB cases, and perhaps other infectious diseases as well.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5393254/pdf/pnas.201621360.pdf

May 11, 2017 at 11:28 am

Powassan Virus Disease in an Infant – Connecticut, 2016.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. Apr 21, 2017 V.66 N.15 P.408-409.

Notes from the Field:

Tutolo JW, Staples JE, Sosa L, Bennett N.

PDF

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/pdfs/mm6615a3.pdf

May 11, 2017 at 11:20 am

Early, Goal-Directed Therapy for Septic Shock — A Patient-Level Meta-Analysis

N Engl J Med  Mar 21, 2017

The PRISM Investigators*

BACKGROUND

After a single-center trial and observational studies suggesting that early, goal-directed therapy (EGDT) reduced mortality from septic shock, three multicenter trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe) showed no benefit. This meta-analysis of individual patient data from the three recent trials was designed prospectively to improve statistical power and explore heterogeneity of treatment effect of EGDT.

METHODS

We harmonized entry criteria, intervention protocols, outcomes, resource-use measures, and data collection across the trials and specified all analyses before unblinding. After completion of the trials, we pooled data, excluding the protocol-based standard-therapy group from the ProCESS trial, and resolved residual differences. The primary outcome was 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included 1-year survival, organ support, and hospitalization costs. We tested for treatment-by-subgroup interactions for 16 patient characteristics and 6 care-delivery characteristics.

RESULTS

We studied 3723 patients at 138 hospitals in seven countries. Mortality at 90 days was similar for EGDT (462 of 1852 patients [24.9%]) and usual care (475 of 1871 patients [25.4%]); the adjusted odds ratio was 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.14; P=0.68). EGDT was associated with greater mean (±SD) use of intensive care (5.3±7.1 vs. 4.9±7.0 days, P=0.04) and cardiovascular support (1.9±3.7 vs. 1.6±2.9 days, P=0.01) than was usual care; other outcomes did not differ significantly, although average costs were higher with EGDT. Subgroup analyses showed no benefit from EGDT for patients with worse shock (higher serum lactate level, combined hypotension and hyperlactatemia, or higher predicted risk of death) or for hospitals with a lower propensity to use vasopressors or fluids during usual resuscitation.

CONCLUSIONS

In this meta-analysis of individual patient data, EGDT did not result in better outcomes than usual care and was associated with higher hospitalization costs across a broad range of patient and hospital characteristics. (Funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and others; PRISM ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02030158.)

PDF

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1701380

May 11, 2017 at 11:13 am

Eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage: a systematic review.

Clin Infect Dis. Apr 1, 2009 V.48 N.7 P.922-30.

Ammerlaan HS1, Kluytmans JA, Wertheim HF, Nouwen JL, Bonten MJ.

Author information

1 Department of Medical Microbiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. H.Ammerlaan@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

A systematic review was performed to determine the effectiveness of different approaches for eradicating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Twenty-three clinical trials were selected that evaluated oral antibiotics (7 trials), topically applied antibiotics (12 trials), or both (4 trials). Because of clinical heterogeneity, quantitative analysis of all studies was deemed to be inappropriate, and exploratory subgroup analyses were performed for studies with similar study populations, methods, and targeted bacteria. The estimated pooled relative risk of treatment failure 1 week after short-term nasal mupirocin treatment, compared with placebo, was 0.10 (range, 0.07-0.14). There was low heterogeneity between study outcomes, and effects were similar for patients and healthy subjects, as well as in studies that included only methicillin-susceptible S. aureus carriers or both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriers. The development of drug resistance during treatment was reported in 1% and 9% of patients receiving mupirocin and oral antibiotics, respectively. Short-term nasal application of mupirocin is the most effective treatment for eradicating methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage, with an estimated success of rate of 90% 1 week after treatment and approximately 60% after a longer follow-up period.

PDF

https://oup.silverchair-cdn.com/oup/backfile/Content_public/Journal/cid/48/7/10.1086/597291/2/48-7-922.pdf?Expires=1494547126&Signature=C-3w0qidaoRa7nD1JLkVurTsGPMZt6nFPH~~ukmz~Wrdd2rLVyc4nFgZ5uT0RDQSwfwFtWB2QPZw8l7HjcKFHWaiSy8qEDU3uZM28k~O4MHJYjd~B86s2~s8-xP9j04r6TKdnJ2lsY3VZLXEb22vNGmERggjk4B2h7DUCAJGXBBba-7AixeOYEbLumFS8-5SmkCgBSKsKsa8UWzqmXJWZrQDlgMLMzqAUURfPITtO9AoiLUzDH~bVNd5zCozVmfpbxf3nAVk4cZVekXwNiAH3SYHOKfVd3YomfEzd5~tBxRwwqnxDp8kvCJtB1oFv9HNMf3Jy1GdMCnjNuyVrA1cQg__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIUCZBIA4LVPAVW3Q

May 10, 2017 at 7:11 pm

“Utilización de penicilina benzatínica como tratamiento para la prevención de sífilis congénita en el primer nivel de atención de la salud.” 36 pags

Organización Panamericana de la Salud

Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

Dirección Provincial de Programas Sanitarios

Dirección HIV/SIDA/ITS

Este documento fue escrito por Mariana Ceriotto (Médica especialista en Infectología y Salud Pública. Diplomada en Gestión Pública. Experta en prevención, diagnóstico y tratamiento de las infecciones perinatales).

La revisión técnica fue realizada por: Marcelo Vila (Asesor Subregional para el Cono Sur- Unidad de VIH, hepatitis, TBC e ITS- OPS/OMS); Adriana Duran (Directora de Programas Sanitarios- Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires) y Mónica Moyano (Directora de VIH-ITS y Hepatitis virales- Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Buenos Aires).

Avalan este documento:

  • Asociación Argentina de Alergia e Inmunología Clínica (AAAeIC)
  • Sociedad Argentina de Infectología (SADI)
  • Sociedad de Ginecología Y Obstetricia de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (SOGBA)
  • Dirección de SIDA y ETS- Ministerio de Salud de la Nación

Esta publicación contó con apoyo financiero de la OPS/OMS.

Contenido

  1. La persistencia del problema de la sífilis congénita como problema de salud pública en Argentina y la región de las Américas
  2. El tratamiento de la embarazada con diagnóstico de sífilis
  3. Alergia a beta-lactámicos
  4. Uso de penicilina benzatínica en el primer nivel de atención
  5. Recomendaciones
  6. Cuestionario para la evaluación de los factores de riesgo
  7. Evaluación de los factores de riesgo de alergia a penicilina
  8. Protocolo de diagnóstico y tratamiento inicial de reacciones anafilácticas
  9. Referencias bibliográficas

 

PDF

http://www.paho.org/arg/images/gallery/PenicilinaFinal.pdf

May 10, 2017 at 7:59 am

Older Posts


Calendar

May 2017
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category