Posts filed under ‘REVIEWS’

A Rose by Any Other Name: Practical Updates on Microbial Nomenclature for Clinical Microbiology

Journal of Clinical Microbiology January 2017 V.55 N.1 P.3-4

EDITORIAL

Colleen S. Kraft, Alexander J. McAdam, and Karen C. Carroll

aDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

bDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

cDivision of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

The clinical microbiology laboratory stands at the interface between basic science, including the study of phylogeny, and applications of science in the very practical world of medical care.

In this context, it is important that laboratory reports balance scientific accuracy with medical utility, and it is particularly difficult to do this in the naming of microorganisms.

New organisms are discovered and named, and our understanding of the relationships between known organisms improves, resulting in the reclassification and renaming of organisms as they are sorted into the correct groups.

In this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology, we are pleased to provide several minireviews that are intended to help clinical microbiologists keep up-to-date with changes in nomenclature for bacteria (1), parasites (2), viruses (3), and fungi (4).

Most of these minireviews focus on human pathogens, but the minireview on viruses includes those affecting nonhuman animals. An article about mycobacterial nomenclature is in preparation and will be published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology when available.

The idea for this informative resource was proposed by Dr. Karen Carroll at the editors’ meeting in 2015.

The editors enthusiastically agreed these reviews would be a useful resource for clinical microbiologists, infectious diseases physicians, laboratory technologists, pharmacists, and infection preventionists, in addition to fostering discussion and teaching of trainees and students.

Several editors volunteered to write the articles, and we plan to update these minireviews every 2 years if they prove to be as useful as we expect….

PDF

http://jcm.asm.org/content/55/1/3.full.pdf+html

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October 19, 2017 at 3:02 pm

Antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women living with HIV: A clinical practice guideline.

BMJ 2017 Sep 11; 358:j3961.

Siemieniuk RAC et al.

Approximately 1.4 million women living with HIV become pregnant every year. Most women use antiretroviral therapy, to reduce the risk of vertical transmission or for personal health reasons. Using the GRADE framework according to the BMJ Rapid Recommendation process, we make recommendations for optimal choice of combination antiretroviral regimen considering patient values and preferences, the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, their uncertainty, and practical issues. We suggest a zidovudine and lamivudine-based regimen over one that includes tenofovir or emtricitabine (weak recommendation). We recommend alternatives over the combination of tenofovir, emtricitabine, and lopinavir/ritonavir (strong recommendation).

FULL TEXT

http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3961

PDF

http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/358/bmj.j3961.full.pdf

October 5, 2017 at 9:52 am

Risk of Recurrence of Adverse Events Following Immunization: A Systematic Review

Pediatrics September 2017 V.140 N.3

Joseline Guetsop Zafack, Gaston De Serres, Marilou Kiely, Marie-Claude Gariépy, Isabelle Rouleau, Karina Anne-Marie Top, for the Canadian Immunization Research Network

Abstract

CONTEXT

Reimmunizing patients who had an adverse event following immunization (AEFI) is sometimes a challenge because there are limited data on the risk and severity of AEFI recurrence.

OBJECTIVE

To summarize the literature on the risk of AEFI recurrence.

DATA SOURCES

PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library.

STUDY SELECTION

We included articles in English or French published before September 30, 2016. Articles were selected if they estimated the risk of AEFI recurrence in at least 5 individuals. Studies with experimental vaccines were excluded.

DATA EXTRACTION

Data on study design, setting, population, vaccines, and AEFI recurrence were extracted.

RESULTS

Twenty-nine articles were included. Among patients with a history of hypotonic hyporesponsive episode (n = 398), anaphylaxis (n = 133), or seizures (n = 60) who were reimmunized, events recurred in 0% to 0.8%. Allergic-like events recurred in 30 of 594 reimmunized patients. Fever recurred in 0% to 84% of 836 reimmunized patients, depending on the vaccine and dose number. Among children with extensive limb swelling after the fourth dose of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, recurrence was higher when the fifth dose was given withthe full-antigen formulation (78%) compared with the reduced-antigen formulation (53%, P = .02)

LIMITATIONS

Many studies, included few patients, and those with severe AEFIs were often not reimmunized.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite vaccines being administered to millions of people annually, there are few studies in which researchers evaluated AEFI recurrence. Published studies suggest that reimmunization is usually safe. However in these studies, severe cases were often not reimmunized.

FULL TEXT

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/140/3/e20163707

PDF

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/140/3/e20163707.full.pdf

September 25, 2017 at 8:22 am

Association Between Cytomegalovirus Reactivation and Clinical Outcomes in Immunocompetent Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Open Forum Infectious Diseases April 2017 V.4 N.2

Philippe Lachance; Justin Chen; Robin Featherstone; Wendy I. Sligl

Background.

The aim of our systematic review was to investigate the association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and outcomes in immunocompetent critically ill patients.

Methods.

We searched electronic databases and gray literature for original studies and abstracts published between 1990 and October 2016. The review was limited to studies including critically ill immunocompetent patients. Cytomegalovirus reactivation was defined as positive polymerase chain reaction, pp65 antigenemia, or viral culture from blood or bronchoalveolar lavage. Selected patient-centered outcomes included mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), and nosocomial infections. Health resource utilization outcomes included intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay.

Results.

Twenty-two studies were included. In our primary analysis, CMV reactivation was associated with increased ICU mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87–3.47), overall mortality (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.60–2.56), duration of mechanical ventilation (mean difference 6.60 days; 95% CI, 3.09–10.12), nosocomial infections (OR, 3.20; 95% CI, 2.05–4.98), need for RRT (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31–4.31), and ICU length of stay (mean difference 8.18 days; 95% CI, 6.14–10.22). In addition, numerous sensitivity analyses were performed.

Conclusions.

In this meta-analysis, CMV reactivation was associated with worse clinical outcomes and greater health resource utilization in critically ill patients. However, it remains unclear whether CMV reactivation plays a causal role or if it is a surrogate for more severe illness.

PDF

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September 3, 2017 at 6:43 pm

Ceftaroline for Severe Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections: A Systematic Review

Open Forum Infectious Diseases April  2017 V.4 N.2

Reese A. Cosimi; Nahal Beik; David W. Kubiak; Jennifer A. Johnson

This article reviews and evaluates the existing literature describing clinical outcomes and safety of ceftaroline in severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

Ceftaroline is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, including cases with concurrent bacteremia. Use for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has risen for a multitude of reasons.

The aim of this article is to review the literature evaluating clinical outcomes and safety of ceftaroline prescribed for serious MRSA infections. We conducted a literature search in Ovid (Medline) and PubMed for reputable case reports, clinical trials, and reviews focusing on the use of ceftaroline for treatment of MRSA infections.

Twenty-two manuscripts published between 2010 and 2016 met inclusion criteria. Mean clinical cure was 74% across 379 patients treated with ceftaroline for severe MRSA infections. Toxicities were infrequent. Ceftaroline treatment resulted in clinical and microbiologic cure for severe MRSA infections. Close monitoring of hematological parameters is necessary with prolonged courses of ceftaroline.

PDF

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September 3, 2017 at 6:40 pm

Review – Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection

Journal of Antimicrobial & Chemotherapy January 1, 2017 V.72 N.1 P.1-18

Mark H. Wilcox, James D. Chalmers, Carl E. Nord, Jane Freeman, and Emilio Bouza

1Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, and Microbiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds, UK

2Tayside Respiratory Research Group, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK

3Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

4Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Europe has increased markedly since 2000. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a strong association between cephalosporin use and CDI, and many national programmes on CDI control have focused on reducing cephalosporin usage. Despite reductions in cephalosporin use, however, rates of CDI have continued to rise.

This review examines the potential association of CDI with cephalosporins, and considers other factors that influence CDI risk. EUCLID (the EUropean, multicentre, prospective biannual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalized patients with Diarrhoea) reported an increase in the annual incidence of CDI from 6.6 to 7.3 cases per 10 000 patient bed-days from 2011–12 to 2012–13, respectively.

While CDI incidence and cephalosporin usage varied widely across countries studied, there was no clear association between overall cephalosporin prescribing (or the use of any particular cephalosporin) and CDI incidence.

Moreover, variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cephalosporins of the same generation make categorization by generation insufficient for predicting impact on gut microbiota. A multitude of additional factors can affect the risk of CDI.

Antibiotic choice is an important consideration; however, CDI risk is associated with a range of antibiotic classes. Prescription of multiple antibiotics and a long duration of treatment are key risk factors for CDI, and risk also differs across patient populations.

We propose that all of these are factors that should be taken into account when selecting an antibiotic, rather than focusing on the exclusion of individual drug classes.

PDF

http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/72/1/1.full.pdf+html

August 19, 2017 at 10:33 am

Distribution of Fatal Vibrio Vulnificus Necrotizing Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Feb;95(5):e2627.

Huang KC1, Weng HH, Yang TY, Chang TS, Huang TW, Lee MS.

Author information

1 From the College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan (K-CH, H-HW, T-SC, T-WH, MSL); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (K-CH, T-YY, T-WH); Department of Diagnostic Radiology (H-HW); Department of Gastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chaiyi (T-SC); and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (MSL).

Abstract

Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections (VNSSTIs), which have increased significantly over the past few decades, are still highly lethal and disabling diseases despite advancing antibiotic and infection control practices. We, therefore, examined the spatiotemporal distribution of worldwide reported episodes and associated mortality rates of VNSSTIs between 1966 and 2014. The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for observational studies on patients with VNSSTIs. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. We did random-effects meta-analysis to obtain estimates for primary outcomes; the estimates are presented as means plus a 95% confidence interval (CI). Data from the selected studies were also extracted and pooled for correlation analyses.Nineteen studies of 2227 total patients with VNSSTIs were analyzed. More than 95% of the episodes occurred in the subtropical western Pacific and Atlantic coastal regions of the northern hemisphere. While the number of cases and the number of deaths were not correlated with the study period (rs = 0.476 and 0.310, P = 0.233 and 0.456, respectively), the 5-year mortality rate was significantly negatively correlated with them (rs = -0.905, P = 0.002). Even so, the pooled estimate of total mortality rates from the random-effects meta-analysis was as high as 37.2% (95% CI: 0.265-0.479).These data suggest that VNSSTIs are always an important public health problem and will become more critical and urgent because of global warming. Knowing the current distribution of VNSSTIs will help focus education, policy measures, early clinical diagnosis, and appropriate medical and surgical treatment for them.

PDF

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4748892/pdf/medi-95-e2627.pdf

August 18, 2017 at 3:51 pm

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